Fr Martin Xavier Vazhachira RIP

FATHER MARTIN XAVIER VAZHACHIRA RIP –
PRESS RELEASE FROM THE SCOTTISH CATHOLIC MEDIA OFFICE.

The Archdiocese of St Andrews & Edinburgh regrets to announce the death of Father Martin Xavier Vazhachira CMI, Administrator of St John’s parish in Corstorphine, Edinburgh. The 33-year old Indian-born priest had been missing since Tuesday. His body was found yesterday evening, Friday 23 June, on a beach at Dunbar, East Lothian. The cause of death is, as yet, unknown.

“The news of Father Martin Xavier’s death comes as a great shock and a great sadness to all those who knew him and loved him,” said Archbishop Leo Cushley of St Andrews & Edinburgh, 24 June.

“Our thoughts and, more importantly, our prayers are with him and with all his loved ones in both Scotland and India. May he rest in peace.”

Father Martin Xavier Vazhachira was a native of Kerela in southern India. He was ordained a priest of the Carmelites of Mary Immaculate order in 2013. He arrived in Scotland in July 2016 in order to undertake post-graduate studies at Edinburgh University. He also served in local Catholic parishes, initially in Falkirk before being appointed to Corstorphine in October 2016.

He was last seen on Tuesday afternoon in his parish house.  The alarm was raised by parishioners after he didn’t turn up for Holy Mass on Wednesday morning. A post-mortem will now be carried out to ascertain the cause of death. His family in India have been informed of the tragic news.

Archbishop Leo Cushley is visiting the parish of St John’s in Corstorphine both today and tomorrow, Sunday, in order to offer Holy Mass and to support and comfort parishioners as they attempt to come to terms with the news of Father Martin Xavier’s death.

Father Martin Xavier Vazhachira CMI (1983-2017). Requiescat in pace.  ENDS

Comment:

Since this young priest had been serving in Scotland at the time of his death, cause not yet known, we launch this thread for the purpose of offering our prayers for the repose of his soul, and for the consolation of his family. Please do not speculate as to the circumstances of his death – we presume he was taken ill when out, perhaps for a walk.  Eternal rest grant unto him, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him, may he rest in peace. 

Should Catholics Welcome Robots?

I listened in disbelief to a lunchtime report on Sky News today, about the way robots are increasingly set to take over from humans in just about every imaginable way. One “expert” commentator spoke in a “what’s the fuss”? tone of voice, suggesting that if robots can do what we do, then we can enjoy life, after all why do humans have to work?  Robot

I am horrified at the idea of buying a meal in a restaurant cooked by a robot – one of the examples given – or of undergoing an operation in hospital performed by another member of the Robot family – one of the other examples given on the news.

Click here to read more and ask yourself whether Catholics can possibly support this “revolution”. Let’s consider the theological reasons – if any – against supporting this latest technological “miracle”.  Do we, for example, continue to  confess our sins ONLY to a priest?

Is This Priest Really In Good Standing?

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A women’s ordination group will hold their annual meeting in a Catholic church for the first time in their history.

Catholic Women’s Ordination (CWO), which was founded in 1993, announced in their latest newsletter that their next annual gathering is due to take place at St Nicholas of Tolentino Church in Bristol.

They described the news that the gathering was taking place in a Catholic church for the first time as “historic” adding that their meeting, on 4 October, will focus on the theme of women in the diaconate.

“This appears to be a subject in the air at present and poses the question: could it be opened to women in the future and if so would members of CWO support the idea?” the newsletter stated.

The question of whether women could be ordained deacons has long been discussed and was recently advocated by then Archbishop of Freiburg and Chairman of the German Bishops’ Conference, Robert Zollitsch, who suggested a specific office of deacon for women.

Fr Richard McKay, the parish priest of St Nicholas Tolentino, said he was happy for the parish to host the meeting and personally supported the ordination of women.

“I understand not everyone would agree – that’s not a problem. But I do think it is a problem that you are not allowed to debate and discuss the matter.”

In 1994 Pope John Paul II said that the Church had no authority to ordain women and that this view “is to be definitively held by all the Church’s faithful.”

On women’s ordination Pope Francis has said: “the Church has spoken and says no … that door is closed.”  Source

Comment

Fr McKay opines that “it’s not a problem” if people disagree with him on the ordination of women. Wrong. It’s a huge problem. Or rather, he’s the problem. I will send him the link to this thread, in the hope that he comes on to explain why we should regard HIM as a “priest in good standing” when he’s disowned definitive Catholic teaching on male-only priesthood, while SSPX priests – who’ve never denied a single doctrine of the Faith – are in an “irregular situation”, falsely labelled “schismatics”.   Just curious…

Must a Priest Always Obey His Bishop?

Never has there been so much talk of the importance of obedience to the Bishop in the Church, coinciding with the widespread disobedience of the Bishops to papal instructions, especially on the Mass, and to key papal documents on the Mass such as Quo Primum.

In the video interview, Fr Gruner spells out the limits of a priest’s obligation to his bishop if he is denied the right to offer the traditional Mass.

Personally, I cannot imagine that there are many, if any, priests who do not know (and even agree with) Fr Gruner’s comments in the above short video clip. So, where are all the “disobedient” clergy in Scotland? England? Wales?

“Whistleblowing” Scots Priest Dismissed

A Scottish Catholic priest, who has fought for 17 years to force the hierarchy to act against a fellow priest who abused him, has been dismissed from the diocese of Galloway while recovering from cancer and issued with a formal warning for talking to the Observer.

Father Patrick Lawson, who spoke out in the Observer in July using the pseudonym “Father Michael”, was sent a decree of removal by Bishop John Cunningham last Wednesday, forcing him to hand over the keys of his parish house within two days. The bishop had consistently refused to accept Father Lawson’s pleas, on the advice of doctors, to drop one of his two parishes – St Paul’s, Hurlford – while convalescing.

The case is a potentially explosive development in an increasingly tense relationship between the Scottish hierarchy and the laity over abuse and cover-up. There is now a standoff in Father Lawson’s other parish – St Sophia’s, Galston – with many parishioners telling the Observer that they will walk out of masses this weekend in protest, cancel their church subscriptions, and refuse to return unless the priest is reinstated.

Parishioner Manuela Kevan says around 200 people have signed a petition backing the popular, hardworking priest. “We know what this is really about.”  Read more

Obviously, we have no way of knowing whether what is reported in the Observer article is accurate or not. We have to take it at face value, in the absence of any other reliable information.  However, it could be one of those “there’s more to this than meets the eye” situations.  Suffice to say that Catholic Truth has had cause to contact Fr Lawson in the past, so we are keeping an open mind on this at the moment and will merely add an observation that it’s interesting to see what it takes to have a priest dismissed. Annoying the bishops?  It’s certainly not writing heresy in the  Catholic papers week in and week out, and similar related dissent, that’s for sure!

Having said all of that, we reported some years ago that the Church in Galloway was in meltdown.  But is it any different from the Church in the rest of Scotland? Frankly, I doubt it. What about you?