When is a Hate Crime NOT a Hate Crime? When it’s Anti-Catholic Hate!

LANARKSHIRE, Scotland, May 1, 2019 (LifeSiteNews) ― Scottish Catholics are shocked and worried after a recent bout of vandalism in and near the city of Glasgow.

On Saturday, April 27, anti-Catholic graffiti was found spray-painted on a bus shelter outside Holy Family Catholic Church in Mossend.
[Ed: Motherwell Diocese – Bishop Toal].

On Monday, April 29, vandals entered St. Simon Catholic Church in Glasgow
 and attacked the sanctuary, overturning candles and a shrine to Our Lady of Częstochowa, and breaking a statue.
[Ed: Archdiocese of Glasgow – Archbishop Tartaglia]

The anti-Catholic graffiti included the timeworn sentiment “F*** the Pope.” The local police said they would meet with the local Catholic diocese.

“Enquiries are ongoing into offensive graffiti painted on boarding near to a Catholic church in Mossend, Lanarkshire (…) ,” the Lanarkshire Police Division tweeted.

“The local policing team in Bellshill will meeting with local representatives from the Diocese of Motherwell with regard to this incident.”

Police in Glasgow stated that there is no evidence the attack on St. Simon’s, the principal place of worship for the city’s Polish community, was either motivated by sectarianism or a hate crime… [emphasis added – for obvious reasons!]

Click here to read the above report in full

Comment:

Catholic churches vandalised, anti-Catholic graffiti found, including the standard “F*** the Pope”, statue broken, candles overturned … but move along,  no hate crime here, nothing to see…

You just could not make this stuff up.  If this had been the place of worship of any other religious group in Scotland, it would have  been headline news for days, and it would most certainly have been categorised as  manifest hate crime.  

Since the Scottish State effectively sanctions hate crimes against Catholics by permitting the annual Orange Parade marches – not to mention dismissing attacks on Catholic churches like those reported above as NOT being hate crimes – it seems that there is really nothing to be done about these manifestations of anti-Catholic hatred.  So, should we simply accept them in humble submission as part of our cross, something to offer up?  Or does that come under the heading of “false charity”?  Should the bishops continue to accept that we are a soft target – or should they toughen up and demand justice – not least since they have a duty to protect the Blessed Sacrament; a broken statue is one thing but desecration of Tabernacles is quite another.  Share your ideas on possible ways to resolve Scotland’s anti-Catholic culture, since, clearly ecumenism is not working.