3rd September: Feast of Pope St Pius X…

Read (or, for now, simply dip into) two key texts for our times: firstly, the landmark encyclical of Pope Saint Pius X Pascendi (on the doctrine of the Modernists) and Archbishop Lefebvre’s Open Letter to Confused Catholics  and then share your thoughts. 

And consider this: the Pontifical High Mass in the Parish of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Balornock, Glasgow, offered by Cardinal Burke at noon today, would not have taken place but for the self-sacrifice of Archbishop Lefebvre, who refused to stand by and permit the ancient Mass to be destroyed in the name of the Vatican II “reforms”.  

To the Archbishop, in fact,  do we owe the Masses now available all over the world, which resulted from Pope Benedict’s Apostolic Letter, given Motu Proprio (on his own initiative/by his own hand), Summorum Pontificum issued in July, 2007. This Motu Proprio was issued  to fulfil a condition of the Bishops of Archbishop Lefebvre’s Society of St Pius X , who insisted that all priests must be permitted to offer the Traditional Latin Mass without any pressure from their bishops, before they, the SSPX bishops,  would resume talks aimed at ending their current “irregular” situation within the Church.  One wonders just how many of those attending Cardinal Burke’s Pontifical High Mass today, and, no doubt, marvelling at its beauty, realise that fact. 

How likely, too, is it that the organisers, or any of the priests in attendance – let alone the Cardinal himself – would remark on this key fact, in all of their conversation about the beauty of the ancient rite of Mass, and the wonder of having it available to the faithful once again, after so many years when it was effectively (and illicitly) prohibited.  

Far, far from our priests be the love of novelty! – Pope Pius X

 

Comments invited…

Pope Francis Causing Catholics To Leave The Church – Can YOU Help Them?

worriedmanI’ve had a number of telephone conversations recently, today included, with very worried Catholics who are either losing the Faith themselves or who know others who are losing the Faith, because of the scandalous things Pope Francis is saying and doing. Some of these people made the mistake of “investigating” (i.e. searching online) for answers and, needless to say, some of them are now toying with all the wrong “answers” – notably sedevacantism. 

In all honestly, I have scant patience with some of these people (and said so) because they apparently failed to notice the modernism of each of Pope Francis’ predecessors. Pope Francis did not appear out of the blue – each of the post-Vatican II popes prepared the path for him to take the Church by storm, so it is irksome to see the new “converts” to the battle against modernism turn the fight into a battle against Christ’s Church. Significantly, some of these new “converts” are relatively recent “converts” from their novus ordo parishes to the SSPX. It is, therefore, twice as concerning to see them risking their souls by entertaining the “anti-pope”, “anti-Christ”, sedevacantist false “answers” to the current scandalous pontificate. Instead of doing their duty as Soldiers of Christ in the battle against modernism,  they become part of the problem, not part of the solution. 

In these contacts with worried Catholics, I’ve given as much Church history as it is possible to squeeze into a couple of hours of conversation and I’ve quoted  St Vincent de Lerins, in order to demonstrate the correct Catholic response to a bad pope, which is to resist his errors and cling to “antiquity” – that is, to Catholic Tradition – while never doubting that Christ has kept His promise to be with His Church until the end of time. Christ assured us that the gates of Hell will never prevail. He made no promise that the gates of Hell will never attack the Church, just that they will never prevail.  I get the feeling, though, that there’s always something more to say, which is where you lot come into the frame…

Explain – in as few words as possible – how you would advise those Catholic who are sorely tempted to abandon the Church and go it alone  – Catholicism to go, so to speak. Provide the links to articles or videos that you think will help, and, of course, pray for all Catholics who are tempted to doubt at this time.  I plan to send the link to this thread to all those online readers who have contacted me in recent times, in the hope that they find it helpful. 

Finally, please pray for Pope Francis who will one day be held to account by God, and made to pay for his dereliction of duty, for the scandal he is causing and for the souls which may be lost because of his false teaching.  His beloved God of Surprises is, as things stand, more likely to have a few shocks than surprises in store for him at his Judgment, so we do need to pray very hard indeed – and urgently – for the conversion of Pope Francis. 

OurLadyofFatima

Our Lady of Fatima, pray for us!

 

Paisley Diocese: Church Vs Christ – Schismatic Call To Revolution…

Blogger, Petrus, a member of the Diocese of Paisley, submitted the following article on the schismatic rumblings lurking in the final document published at the conclusion of  the recent diocesan meeting of malcontents aka diocesan “synod”. 

 

Pope Francis wants the Church to stop what it has been doing and make a fresh start. He is calling for a revolution in our thinking and acting. We have to stop trying to save the Church and instead try to spread the Gospel.

Pope Francis wants the Church to stop what it has been doing and make a fresh start. He is calling for a revolution in our thinking and acting. We have to stop trying to save the Church and instead try to spread the Gospel. (From the Final Document, Diocesan Synod)

 

On becoming Bishop of Paisley, Bishop John Keenan announced that he would hold a Diocesan Synod on the “New Evangelisation”.  I emailed the bishop with these recommendations to before the synod:

  • The faithful should receive Holy Communion kneeling and on the tongue.
  • Only the priest should distribute the Blessed Sacrament.
  • Restore the practice of altar servers being exclusively male given that there is a strong link between serving on the altar and vocations to the priesthood.
  • Restore Latin to the liturgy in every parish.
  • Weekly benediction of the blessed Sacrament and parish Rosary in every parish.
  • Consecrate the Diocese of Paisley to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I’ve just read Bishop Keenan’s reply, saying this was music to his ears! However, there’s not a mention of these things in the final document, which has just been published.  The document is scandalous. I have provided the worst quotes from the report below.

Anyone wishing to read the entire document will find it here

The centre piece of the publication is the Diocesan Charter:

Paisley Diocesan Charter

 The Diocese of Paisley, with the guidance of the Holy Spirit and through the patronage of Our Lady of Paisley, will work towards being a faith filled community where:

  • There is a commitment to effective evangelisation centred on a personal relationship with Jesus Christ and a life lived with faith and charity.
  • Faith formation and active discipleship are of fundamental importance in developing the ‘Role of the Laity in the New Evangelisation’ within our parish and diocesan communities.
  • There is dynamic and collaborative engagement among all those called through Baptism into the family of God to use their gifts and talents to build up the body of Christ in an atmosphere of mutual respect.
  • All families feel welcome when they enter the church for liturgies, sacramental preparation or for support of any kind.
  • Youth are valued as bringing life to the Church.
  • There is a commitment to reach out to all of society, in particular those who feel excluded, offering witness to our belief that each person, made in the image and likeness of God, is deserving of dignity and respect.
  • The structures of the Diocese are designed to meet the needs of the diverse communities that they serve.
  • Each parish grows as a welcoming family of faith and each member of the parish community feels they belong and have something to contribute.
  • Communication in all its components: the message, the medium and the language, is understood as central to the success of the church in the modern era.
  • We actively use communication to promote the gospel message of peace and reconciliation.   END

As readers will no doubt note, this could be used in any denomination and nothing marks this out as Catholic.

As we move into the main body of the document I will simply provide the worst of what is a completely non-Catholic publication:

“Pope Francis wants the Church to stop what it has been doing and make a fresh start.  He is calling for a revolution in our thinking and acting.  We have to stop trying to save the Church and instead try to spread the Gospel.”

“The Fathers of the Second Vatican Council thought that the laity had become too passive or secondary as members in the Church, not much more than the ‘long arm’ of the clergy.  They had not been afforded their own proper dignity, vocation and responsibility. “

“New evangelisation is ecumenical. New evangelisation sees Catholics, Protestants and Evangelicals working together in the world, passing on the central Christian message.”

“Our Church is tired and too introverted to change.  Many practising  Catholics see the Church like belonging to a spiritual club that exists for the personal benefit of its members.”

There then follows a section on the feedback the bishop received as he went round the Diocese prior to the synod.  This is obviously feedback the bishop sympathises with (there’s no mention of the feedback I provided).

  1. “We need a new Pentecost. Our Pentecostal brethren are strong and we can learn from them.”
  2. “We can learn from Pentecostal services which are different every week. The young find Mass boring. We need to find different ways of celebrating it in order to convert them.”
  3. “Those who cannot go to Holy Communion should be addressed. The Church is conflicted on the GAY issue. They perceive themselves to be judged.  No-one asked them what their life is like.  The Church needs to look at how it treats GAYs and the marginalised.  The trials of life take people away, e.g. divorce. So they do not feel part of the Church. This means we lose the parents and we lose the children.  What can we do about this?  Is it structural?  Also policies must include others.  We should ask priests to apologise to those who now no longer feel part of the Church.”
  4. “How about an ecumenical Praise in the Park? As a young person I am really encouraged by this forward-thinking approach of innovation but I can understand the issues other are raising.  We all have to look forward progressively.  We cannot worry about the past but must now make the diocese better.  This may be uncomfortable but remember the aim, a better, stronger diocese. “
  1. “We need to listen to the perspective of the young. Evangelical churches set up creative ways to bring Christ alive for children.  We can learn from them. “
  2. “We need to focus on the Holy Spirit and work with Pentecostal groups, like Healing Rooms. We are losing our Catholics to them.  There are no barriers at ground level to ecumenical work.  We are just brothers who love Jesus.   How does the ecumenical dimension tie into our renewal?  We need to be with other Christians as churches and communities together.  Can we not learn from other faiths?  We have a lot to learn from evangelical communities.  Ecumenism has often been formal and top down.  It would be good for it to be at ground level.  We can learn much from interfaith.”
  3. “Encouraging boys to serve at the altar is one way of promoting vocations although it would need to avoid the perception of sexism or the criticism of not learning anything from recent scandals. Young people should not be exclusively identified with boys and too much emphasis need not be placed on gender. Female servers, in fact, encourages vocations to the religious life and serving at the altar is a way for all young people to grow in their faith and prepare to live their Catholic vocation as married, single or religious.”  END        

I think in terms of renewing the Diocese of Paisley this synod and final publication has zero chance of making any meaningful impact. In fact, there’s really nothing Catholic about this at all.    Signed… Petrus.

Comment

Before he was announced as the new Bishop of Paisley, “Father John Keenan” was repeatedly described to me as “on our side”, an “orthodox” priest. This despite the fact that he showed absolutely no sign whatsoever of being orthodox, no interest in our work. He presumably pretended to be “on our side” but I never once heard from him – like every other career-priest in Scotland, he ignored us.  Then, too, there was the inconvenient fact that, as Catholic chaplain at Glasgow University, he permitted one dissenter after another to use the chaplaincy as a platform to spread their anti-Catholicism and adversely influence students. He would  bleat that he really couldn’t do anything about it, when one of the Catholic Truth team would ring him to ask him to prevent this latest scandal.  

So, now, here we have him in full blown dissent – not from Pope Francis, of course (that would be virtually impossible) but in dissent from Catholic teaching which decrees that to separate Christ from His Church is heresy.  As Cardinal Newman put it, “…the Catholic Church IS the Christian dispensation”.  Catholicism IS Christianity. Yet, Bishop Keenan urges us to learn from “our Pentecostal brethren” (Protestant extremists, albeit well-meaning individuals) and to scrap the Church (in accordance with Pope Francis’ desire) in order to start afresh.  Now, about THAT they can certainly learn from the Protestants. They’ve been starting new churches since Luther, Knox & Company started the bandwagon rolling way back in the Middle Ages.  The writer of the Final Document appears not to have noticed the irony in the the remark that “we are losing our Catholics to Pentecostal groups” – and I doubt if Bishop Keenan will recognise all the irony, all the NON-Catholicity in each and every sentiment of that awful document. Let’s hope it’s actually NOT the “final” document – or Paisley is doomed. 

Now, don’t tell me that this is just a diocesan synod and so  these suggestions probably came from lay people, or some dissenting clergy.  Who cares?  That would simply serve to underline the Bishop’s negligence, his dereliction of duty. You read Petrus’s suggestions, entirely in keeping with Catholic Tradition; if Bishop Keenan is so “orthodox” (yeah right)  why didn’t he clutch at those suggestions  as a drowning man clutches at the proverbial straw?  

It’s the Bishop’s job to act as shepherd, keeping the faithful on the right path. If the Bishop had truly lamented the errors, the modernist spirit, in which his synod was clearly steeped,  he should have closed it down and sent the revolutionaries home. Fleas in ears, springs to mind. 

Do you see why Our Lord warned us to beware of false prophets? Do you recognise Bishop Keenan as a shepherd in wolves’ clothing?  Can you see why he – and his ilk – is heading for Hell?  If not, visit Specsavers.  One thing is clear: if you want to save your soul, avoid Paisley Diocese like the plague.

And about that “revolution”… buy yourself a copy of the Catechism of the Council of Trent. That way, you really will revolutionise your Faith and start afresh [your spiritual life, NOT “The Church”].  We’re called to sanctify ourselves. That’s our essential Catholic vocation. We are called to change ourselves. We are  NOT called to change the Church.

Let’s hear your verdict on the Paisley synod.   

A Tale of Two Priests & Two Masses

From America Magazine…

An ordinary Sunday morning. No parish assignment, no preaching. So I decide to go to a church that celebrates the Latin Mass every Sunday at 11 AM. I knew it would be in Latin, but I wasn’t sure if it would be the old Tridentine or new post-Vatican II Latin Mass. Clearly it was Tridentine! One reason to attend was to see if I could feel comfortable being the main celebration of the Latin Mass.  

A female altar server assists at a Mass celebrated by Cardinal O’Malley in 2013.Pilot file photo/ Gregory L. Tracy

A female altar server assists at a novus ordo Mass celebrated by Cardinal O’Malley in 2013.

The church was half-filled, older men and women, some families with children, and a number of people in their 30’s who followed with their missals. The music, all in Latin, was in abundance with 90 percent sung by the choir and little by the congregation. The opening procession included 8 servers in surplices (all male), an assistant to the priest and the main celebrant…

REACTIONS. During the celebration I felt very uncomfortable. It was strange and foreign. Even though I was very familiar with the Tridentine Mass from my childhood, it seemed remote and distant. The Mass seemed to focus on the priest whose words for the most part could not be heard (they were in Latin anyway!) and who rarely faced the people. The choir performed well and their singing overrode the priest, who had to wait several times until they finished singing.

In my mind I could not but think back to the Second Vatican Council, and all that the Council and subsequent documents tried to bring about – active participation, emphasis on the important things, vernacular, elimination of accretions and repetitions, etc. It was sad and disheartening. What happened? Why would the Catholic faithful seek out and attend this older form of the Mass? Is the Tridentine Mass an aberration? What does it say about the reforms of Vatican II?

After the Mass, I was tempted to talk with some of those present. But I decided not to as I feared I would have been negative and perhaps controversial. My feelings were still very raw. One thing I know: I myself will never freely choose to celebrate the Tridentine Mass.  Click here to read article in full

From Traditional Catholic Priest (Blog)…

Constantly I hear from people that they do not go to the Latin Mass because they do not understand Latin.  (Some even think that the homily is in Latin.)  So please, just for now, let us put aside the argument of the language; Latin or English and go to the prayers and actions that are part of the rubrics of the two masses.  Let us also look at who is the center of focus and the way the people participate, dress and receive God in Holy Communion at the two masses. 

Traditional (Latin) Mass

Traditional (Latin) Mass

As a priest, I want to re-clarify what are the differences on how Jesus is treated in the two masses.   This will be from my own stand point as a priest who has for years celebrated the New Mass in English and Spanish, and now, for the last 7 years offered the Ancient Holy Sacrifice of the Mass…

From my view up on the altar, the difference between the Ancient Mass and the New Mass is like day and night.  Archbishop Sample, from Portland Oregon, put it well when he said at the Sacra Liturgia Conference in Rome, that he wants all of his priests to learn and offer the Latin Mass because of the effect it has on them understanding their role as priests.  He said that offering the Holy Latin Mass has changed him completely and now he finally understands the sacrificial aspect of his priesthood..

As a priest who says the New Mass and the Latin Mass, the Latin Mass has by far more rubrics built right into the Latin Mass to protect the Body and Blood of Jesus from being desecrated in any manner.  It clearly has the strong sacrificial component of the Holy Mass and priesthood.  It does not have the protestant emphasis on the Last Supper and “doing this in remembrance of Me” like the Luther advocated.  It also has prayers and gestures that facilitate more easily the adoration that Jesus deserves from us His creatures.  And because of this, the Latin Mass pleases God way more than the New Mass. Click here to read article in full

 

Comments invited – how did YOU vote in the poll: and why?

17/10: Feast of the “First Fridays’ Saint”!

SAINT MARGARET MARY ALACOQUE, VIRGIN—1690  Feast: October 17

In seventeenth-century France the faith of the people had been badly shaken; there was rebellion against the Church and neglect of its teachings; the rise of Protestantism and the spread of the heresy of Jansenism[1] both had a part in the weakening of the structure built up through the ages. But as every threat brings its response, so now there rose up fresh, strong forces to counter these trends. Three famous religious, who are today venerated as saints, were particularly effective: John Eudes and Claude de la Columbiere were French Jesuit priests and writers; Margaret Mary Alacoque was a simple nun of the order of the Visitation. Their special work was to popularize the devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. To represent this trio and this movement, we have chosen Margaret Mary Alacoque.  

Click on image to read the 12 Promises of the Sacred Heart

Click on image to read the 12 Promises of the Sacred Heart

She was born in 1647 at Janots, a small town of Burgundy, the fifth of seven children, of Claude and Philiberte Alacoque. Her father was a prosperous notary; the family owned a country house and farmland, and had some aristocratic connections. Margaret’s godmother was a neighbor, the Countess of Corcheval. As a small child Margaret spent a great deal of time with her, but these visits were brought to a sudden end by the death of the countess. The father died of pneumonia when Margaret was about eight, and this was another severe shock to the little girl. Claude had loved his family dearly but had been short-sighted and extravagant. His death put them in hard straits. However, Margaret was sent to school with the Urbanist Sisters at Charolles. She loved the peace and order of the convent life, and the nuns were so impressed by her devotion that she was allowed to make her First Communion at the age of nine. A rheumatic affliction kept her bedridden for four years. During this time she was brought home, where some of her father’s relatives had moved in and taken over the direction of the farm and household. She and her mother were disregarded, and treated almost as servants. This painful situation grew more acute after Margaret’s recovery, for the relatives tried to regulate all her comings and goings. Not allowed to attend church as often as she pleased, the young girl was sometimes seen weeping and praying in a corner of the garden. It grieved her deeply that she could not ease things for her mother. Her eldest brother’s coming of age saved the day, for the property now reverted to him, and the family again had undisputed possession of their home.

Philiberte expressed a hope that Margaret would marry; the girl considered the step, inflicting severe austerities upon herself during a period of indecision. At the age of twenty, inspired by a vision, she put aside all such thoughts and resolved to enter a convent. While awaiting admission, she tried to help and teach certain neglected children of the village. At twenty-two she made her profession at the convent of the Visitation at Paray-le-Monial. The nuns of the Order of the Visitation, founded in the early years of the seventeenth century by St. Francis de Sales, were famed for their humility and selflessness. As a novice Margaret excelled in these virtues. When she made her profession, the name of Mary was added and she was called Margaret Mary. She began a course of mortifications and penances which were to continue, with more or less intensity, as long as she lived. We are told that she was assigned to the infirmary and was not very skillful at her tasks.

Some years passed quietly in the convent, and then Margaret Mary began to have experiences which seemed to be of supernatural origin. The first of these occurred on December 27, 1673, when she was kneeling at the grille in the chapel. She felt suffused by the Divine Presence, and heard the Lord inviting her to take the place which St. John had occupied at the Last Supper. The Lord told her that the love of His heart must spread and manifest itself to men, and He would reveal its graces through her. This was the beginning of a series of revelations covering a period of eighteen months. When Margaret Mary went to the Superior, Mother de Saumaise, with an account of these mystical experiences, claiming that she, an humble nun, had been chosen as the transmitter of a new devotion to the Sacred Heart, she was reprimanded for her presumption. Seriously overwrought, Margaret Mary suffered a collapse, and became so ill that her life was despaired of. Now the Mother Superior reflected that she might have erred in scorning the nun’s story and vowed that if her life were spared, she would take it as a sign that the visions and messages were truly from God. When Margaret Mary recovered, the Superior invited some theologians who happened to be in the town -they included a Jesuit and a Benedictine-to hear the story. These priests listened and judged the young nun to be a victim of delusions. Their examination had been a sheer torture to Margaret Mary. Later a Jesuit, Father Claude de la Columbiere, talked to her and was completely convinced of the genuineness of the revelations. He was to write of the nun and to inaugurate this devotion in England.

For many years the nun suffered from despair, from self-inflicted punishments, and also from the slights and contempt of those around her. In 1681 Father Claude returned to the convent and died there the following year. Margaret Mary was appointed assistant and novice-mistress by a new Mother Superior who was more sympathetic towards her. Opposition ceased-or at least was restrained-after an account of Margaret Mary’s visions was read aloud in the refectory from the writings left by Father Claude, who had taken it upon himself to make known to the world the nun’s remarkable experiences. That she was finally vindicated was to her a matter of indifference. When she was forty-three, while serving a second term as assistant superior, Margaret Mary fell ill. Sinking rapidly, she received the Last Sacraments, saying, “I need nothing but God, and to lose myself in the heart of Jesus.”

Although the devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus was practised before this time, it now gained a strong new impetus through the work of Father John Eudes and the writings of Father Claude. The Sacred Heart is regarded as “the symbol of that boundless love which moved the Word to take flesh, to institute the Holy Eucharist, to take our sins upon Himself, and, dying on the Cross, to offer Himself as a victim and sacrifice to the eternal Father.” The cult first became popular in France, then spread to Poland and other countries, including, at a later period, the United States. The first petition to the Holy See for the institution of the feast was from Queen Mary, consort of James II of England. The month of June is appointed for this devotion, and since 1929 the feast has been one of the highest rank.  Source

Comment

I sometimes wonder if there are  many modern Catholics who still value devotions such as the Nine First Fridays.  Does anyone know?  What about the Catholics in your circle of family and friends – do they ever mention “doing the First Fridays”?  Do the diocesan priests ever preach about this devotion? Have YOU made the Nine First Fridays? If not, why not?

3/9: Feast of Pope St Pius X…

Joseph Sarto was born in Riese in Venetia on Jun 2nd, 1835. He was successively curate, parish priest, Bishop of Mantua, patriarch of Venice. He was elected Pope on August 4, 1903.  As chief pastor of the Church he realised to the full the value of the liturgy as the prayer of the Church and spared no effort to propagate the practice of frequent and daily Communion. In his encyclical Pascendi Domini Gregis, he exposed and condemned the modernist heresy with force and clarity (1907). He died on  August 20, 1914 and was canonised on May 29, 1954.  (From 1962, Missal, Feast of St Pius X, Pope. Confessor)

PopeSaintPiusXfaceblackandwhite

Comments invited, with a suggestion to pray to this great Pope-Saint for the present Modernist Pope, Francis. 

Strict Protestants & Traditional Catholicism Vs Modern Catholics…

ImageOne of our sometime bloggers, Whistleblower, submitted the following short article and link for discussion.

I was astounded when I came across this website.    I wonder if bloggers agree that it’s astounding that staunch Protestants have their finger on the pulse more than modern Catholics?  In some ways, I feel I have more in common with these Wee Frees than the people in my local parish. 

 

Comment

Well? Does Whistleblower have a point? Tell us your thoughts.