Archbishop Viganò: Don’t Leave the Church – Stay and Fight the Modernists! 

This new statement is important, inasmuch as in recent days, both Father Thomas Weinandy, as well as Father Raymond de Souza, spread the suspicion that the Italian prelate might be “schismatic,” thus intending to leave the Catholic Church. This suspicion had arisen because of Viganò’s critique of the Second Vatican Council and its detrimental effects on the life of the faith in the Church. For example, de Souza’s article is entitled: “Is Archbishop Viganò’s Rejection of the Second Vatican Council Promoting Schism?” And Weinandy stated: “My concern is that, in his radical reading of the Council, the archbishop is spawning his own schism.”

In an August 22 article published by the traditional Catholic newspaper Catholic Family News, Kokx had asked Viganò a set of questions with regard to what faithful laity can do in the midst of this Church crisis that is going back to the Council. 

Kokx suggested Viganò needs to give more advice to laity and priests on what to do next: “He’s certainly diagnosed the problem, but what are his solutions, if any? What, in other words, is it that he believes Catholics in the 21st century should do in response to the crisis?”

Archbishop Viganò’s response as published on September 1 by Catholic Family News (see full text below) is clear: it is not the faithful Catholics who oppose the changing of the faith, but those who perpetrate these changes that ought to be questioned. He writes that we need to discuss “the position of those who, declaring themselves Catholic, embrace the heterodox doctrines that have spread over these decades, with the awareness that these represent a rupture with the preceding Magisterium. In this case it is licit to doubt their real adherence to the Catholic Church, in which however they hold official roles that confer authority on them.”

If people who hold heterodox views are in positions of authority in the Church, he continues, “It is an illicitly exercised authority, if its purpose is to force the faithful to accept the revolution imposed since the Council.”

In addition and on a practical level, the Italian prelate gives us advice on how to live and grow in the faith, working on our sanctification and remaining in the state of “sanctifying grace.” But at the same time, we are to assist and “comfort” good priests and bishops, seeking out reverent Masses. 

“Faithful laity have the right and the duty to find priests, communities, and institutes that are faithful to the perennial Magisterium,” Viganò explains. “And may they know how to accompany the laudable celebration of the liturgy in the Ancient Rite with adherence to sound doctrine and morals, without any subsidence on the front of the Council.”

Finally, Archbishop Viganò also praises the Society of Saint Pius X (SSPX), which has defended the traditional faith for decades now. They “deserve recognition” for their work of preserving the Catholic faith, he says, and adds that he considers Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, the founder of this Society, to be a “confessor of the Faith.”

Here we might remember that just recently, a cardinal stated that Lefebvre will one day be declared a “Doctor of the Church” and that he was “prophetic.”

Let us close with Viganò’s last words of his response to Kokx’s questions:

“The cure for rebellion is obedience. The cure for heresy is faithfulness to the teaching of Tradition. The cure for schism is filial devotion for the Sacred Pastors. The cure for apostasy is love for God and His Most Holy Mother. The cure for vice is the humble practice of virtue. The cure for the corruption of morals is to live constantly in the presence of God. But obedience cannot be perverted into stolid servility; respect for authority cannot be perverted into the obeisance of the court. And let’s not forget that if it is the duty of the laity to obey their Pastors, it is even a more grave duty of the Pastors to obey God, usque ad effusionem sanguinis.”

Below is the full statement by Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, reprinted with permission:

Disclaimer: The following positions adopted and advice offered by Archbishop Viganò do not necessarily represent the views of LifeSiteNews and are presented only for your information.

Dear Mr. Kokx,

I read with lively interest your article “Questions for Viganò: His Excellency is Right about Vatican II, But What Does He Think Catholic Should Do Now?” which was published by Catholic Family News on August 22 (here). I am happy to respond to your questions, which address matters that are very important for the faithful.

You ask: “What would ‘separating’ from the Conciliar Church look like in Archbishop Viganò’s opinion?” I respond to you with another question: “What does it mean to separate from the Catholic Church according to the supporters of the Council?” While it is clear that no admixture is possible with those who propose adulterated doctrines of the conciliar ideological manifesto, it should be noted that the simple fact of being baptized and of being living members of the Church of Christ does not imply adherence to the conciliar team; this is true above all for the simple faithful and also for secular and regular clerics who, for various reasons, sincerely consider themselves Catholics and recognize the Hierarchy.

Instead, what needs to be clarified is the position of those who, declaring themselves Catholic, embrace the heterodox doctrines that have spread over these decades, with the awareness that these represent a rupture with the preceding Magisterium. In this case it is licit to doubt their real adherence to the Catholic Church, in which however they hold official roles that confer authority on them. It is an illicitly exercised authority, if its purpose is to force the faithful to accept the revolution imposed since the Council.

Once this point has been clarified, it is evident that it is not the traditional faithful – that is, true Catholics, in the words of Saint Pius X – that must abandon the Church in which they have the full right to remain and from which it would be unfortunate to separate; but rather the Modernists who usurp the Catholic name, precisely because it is only the bureaucratic element that permits them not to be considered on a par with any heretical sect. This claim of theirs serves in fact to prevent them from ending up among the hundreds of heretical movements that over the course of the centuries have believed to be able to reform the Church at their own pleasure, placing their pride ahead of humbly guarding the teaching of Our Lord. But just as it is not possible to claim citizenship in a homeland in which one does not know its language, law, faith and tradition; so it is impossible that those who do not share the faith, morals, liturgy, and discipline of the Catholic Church can arrogate to themselves the right to remain within her and even to ascend the levels of the hierarchy.

The situation is certainly more complex for clerics, who depend hierarchically on their bishop or religious superior, but who at the same time have the right to remain Catholic and be able to celebrate according to the Catholic Rite. On the one hand laity have more freedom of movement in choosing the community to which they turn for Mass, the Sacraments, and religious instruction, but less autonomy because of the fact that they still have to depend on a priest; on the other hand, clerics have less freedom of movement, since they are incardinated in a diocese or order and are subject to ecclesiastical authority, but they have more autonomy because of the fact that they can legitimately decide to celebrate the Mass and administer the Sacraments in the Tridentine Rite and to preach in conformity with sound doctrine. The Motu Proprio Summorum Pontificum reaffirmed that faithful and priests have the inalienable right – which cannot be denied – to avail themselves of the liturgy that more perfectly expresses their Catholic Faith. But this right must be used today not only and not so much to preserve the extraordinary form of the rite, but to testify to adherence to the depositum fidei that finds perfect correspondence only in the Ancient Rite.

I daily receive heartfelt letters from priests and religious who are marginalized or transferred or ostracized because of their fidelity to the Church: the temptation to find an ubi consistam [a place to stand] far from the clamor of the Innovators is strong, but we ought to take an example from the persecutions that many saints have undergone, including Saint Athanasius, who offers us a model of how to behave in the face of widespread heresy and persecuting fury. As my venerable brother Bishop Athanasius Schneider has many times recalled, the Arianism that afflicted the Church at the time of the Holy Doctor of Alexandria in Egypt was so widespread among the bishops that it leaves one almost to believe that Catholic orthodoxy had completely disappeared. But it was thanks to the fidelity and heroic testimony of the few bishops who remained faithful that the Church knew how to get back up again. Without this testimony, Arianism would not have been defeated; without our testimony today, Modernism and the globalist apostasy of this pontificate will not be defeated.

It is therefore not a question of working from within the Church or outside it: the winemakers are called to work in the Lord’s Vineyard, and it is there that they must remain even at the cost of their lives; the pastors are called to pastor the Lord’s Flock, to keep the ravenous wolves at bay and to drive away the mercenaries who are not concerned with the salvation of the sheep and lambs.

This hidden and often silent work has been carried out by the Society of Saint Pius X, which deserves recognition for not having allowed the flame of Tradition to be extinguished at a moment in which celebrating the ancient Mass was considered subversive and a reason for excommunication. Its priests have been a healthy thorn in the side for a hierarchy that has seen in them an unacceptable point of comparison for the faithful, a constant reproach for the betrayal committed against the people of God, an inadmissible alternative to the new conciliar path. And if their fidelity made disobedience to the pope inevitable with the episcopal consecrations, thanks to them the Society was able to protect herself from the furious attack of the Innovators and by its very existence it allowed the possibility of the liberalization of the Ancient Rite, which until then was prohibited. Its presence also allowed the contradictions and errors of the conciliar sect to emerge, always winking at heretics and idolaters but implacably rigid and intolerant towards Catholic Truth.

I consider Archbishop Lefebvre an exemplary confessor of the Faith, and I think that by now it is obvious that his denunciation of the Council and the modernist apostasy is more relevant than ever. It should not be forgotten that the persecution to which Archbishop Lefebvre was subjected by the Holy See and the world episcopate served above all as a deterrent for Catholics who were refractory toward the conciliar revolution.

I also agree with the observation of His Excellency Bishop Bernard Tissier de Mallerais about the co-presence of two entities in Rome: the Church of Christ has been occupied and eclipsed by the modernist conciliar structure, which has established itself in the same hierarchy and uses the authority of its ministers to prevail over the Spouse of Christ and our Mother.

The Church of Christ – which not only subsists in the Catholic Church, but is exclusively the Catholic Church – is only obscured and eclipsed by a strange extravagant Church established in Rome, according to the vision of Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich. It coexists, like wheat with the tare, in the Roman Curia, in dioceses, in parishes. We cannot judge our pastors for their intentions, nor suppose that all of them are corrupt in faith and morals; on the contrary, we can hope that many of them, hitherto intimidated and silent, will understand, as confusion and apostasy continue to spread, the deception to which they have been subjected and will finally shake off their slumber. There are many laity who are raising their voice; others will necessarily follow, together with good priests, certainly present in every diocese. This awakening of the Church militant – I would dare to call it almost a resurrection – is necessary, urgent and inevitable: no son tolerates his mother being outraged by the servants, or his father being tyrannized by the administrators of his goods. The Lord offers us, in these painful situations, the possibility of being His allies in fighting this holy battle under His banner: the King Who is victorious over error and death permits us to share the honor of triumphal victory and the eternal reward that derives from it, after having endured and suffered with Him.

But in order to deserve the immortal glory of Heaven we are called to rediscover – in an emasculated age devoid of values such as honor, faithfulness to one’s word, and heroism – a fundamental aspect of the faith of every baptized person: the Christian life is a militia, and with the Sacrament of Confirmation we are called to be soldiers of Christ, under whose insignia we must fight. Of course, in most cases it is essentially a spiritual battle, but over the course of history we have seen how often, faced with the violation of the sovereign rights of God and the liberty of the Church, it was also necessary to take up arms: we are taught this by the strenuous resistance to repel the Islamic invasions in Lepanto and on the outskirts of Vienna, the persecution of the Cristeros in Mexico, of the Catholics in Spain, and even today by the cruel war against Christians throughout the world. Never as today can we understand the theological hatred coming from the enemies of God, inspired by Satan. The attack on everything that recalls the Cross of Christ – on Virtue, on the Good and the Beautiful, on purity – must spur us to get up, in a leap of pride, in order to claim our right not only not to be persecuted by our external enemies but also and above all to have strong and courageous pastors, holy and God-fearing, who will do exactly what their predecessors have done for centuries: preach the Gospel of Christ, convert individuals and nations, and expand the Kingdom of the living and true God throughout the world.

We are all called to make an act of Fortitude – a forgotten cardinal virtue, which not by chance in Greek recalls virile strength, ἀνδρεία – in knowing how to resist the Modernists: a resistance that is rooted in Charity and Truth, which are attributes of God.

If you only celebrate the Tridentine Mass and preach sound doctrine without ever mentioning the Council, what can they ever do to you? Throw you out of your churches, perhaps, and then what? No one can ever prevent you from renewing the Holy Sacrifice, even if it is on a makeshift altar in a cellar or an attic, as the refractory priests did during the French Revolution, or as happens still today in China. And if they try to distance you, resist: canon law serves to guarantee the government of the Church in the pursuit of its primary purposes, not to demolish it. Let’s stop fearing that the fault of the schism lies with those who denounce it, and not, instead, with those who carry it out: the ones who are schismatics and heretics are those who wound and crucify the Mystical Body of Christ, not those who defend it by denouncing the executioners!

The laity can expect their ministers to behave as such, preferring those who prove that they are not contaminated by present errors. If a Mass becomes an occasion of torture for the faithful, if they are forced to assist at sacrileges or to support heresies and ramblings unworthy of the House of the Lord, it is a thousand times preferable to go to a church where the priest celebrates the Holy Sacrifice worthily, in the rite given to us by Tradition, with preaching in conformity with sound doctrine. When parish priests and bishops realize that the Christian people demand the Bread of Faith, and not the stones and scorpions of the neo-church, they will lay aside their fears and comply with the legitimate requests of the faithful. The others, true mercenaries, will show themselves for what they are and will be able to gather around them only those who share their errors and perversions. They will be extinguished by themselves: the Lord dries up the swamp and makes the land on which brambles grow arid; he extinguishes vocations in corrupt seminaries and in convents rebellious to the Rule.

The lay faithful today have a sacred task: to comfort good priests and good bishops, gathering like sheep around their shepherds. Give them hospitality, help them, console them in their trials. Create community in which murmuring and division do not predominate, but rather fraternal charity in the bond of Faith. And since in the order established by God – κόσμος – subjects owe obedience to authority and cannot do otherwise than resist it when it abuses its power, no fault will be attributed to them for the infidelity of their leaders, on whom rests the very serious responsibility for the way in which they exercise the vicarious power which has been given to them. We must not rebel, but oppose; we must not be pleased with the errors of our pastors, but pray for them and admonish them respectfully; we must not question their authority but the way in which they use it.

I am certain, with a certainty that comes to me from Faith, that the Lord will not fail to reward our fidelity, after having punished us for the faults of the men of the Church, granting us holy priests, holy bishops, holy cardinals, and above all a holy Pope. But these saints will arise from our families, from our communities, from our churches: families, communities, and churches in which the grace of God must be cultivated with constant prayer, with the frequenting of Holy Mass and the Sacraments, with the offering of sacrifices and penances that the Communion of Saints permits us to offer to the Divine Majesty in order to expiate our sins and those of our brethren, including those who exercise authority. The laity have a fundamental role in this, guarding the Faith within their families, in such a way that our young people who are educated in love and in the fear of God may one day be responsible fathers and mothers, but also worthy ministers of the Lord, His heralds in the male and female religious orders, and His apostles in civil society.

The cure for rebellion is obedience. The cure for heresy is faithfulness to the teaching of Tradition. The cure for schism is filial devotion for the Sacred Pastors. The cure for apostasy is love for God and His Most Holy Mother.

Our Lady of Fatima, pray for us!

The cure for vice is the humble practice of virtue. The cure for the corruption of morals is to live constantly in the presence of God. But obedience cannot be perverted into stolid servility; respect for authority cannot be perverted into the obeisance of the court. And let’s not forget that if it is the duty of the laity to obey their Pastors, it is even a more grave duty of the Pastors to obey God, usque ad effusionem sanguinis.

+ Carlo Maria Viganò, Archbishop
September 1, 2020               

Source               

Comments invited…                                    

3 September: Feast of St Pius X: Greatest Pope of 20 Century – “Miracle Saint”…

The light that shone in the Church during eleven years of pontificate was extinguished on August 20, 1914. Pope Pius X fell sick on the Feast of the Assumption of Our Lady (Aug. 15) and received extreme unction and Holy Viaticum before dying. He was buried August 23, and his tomb immediately became the object of a popular devotion. 

Santo Subito

Pope Pius X’s reputation of sanctity was immediate. This was undoubtedly due to his qualities as a “miracle-saint” but also on account of the respect he inspired by his supernatural bearing. A number of cardinals, archbishops, bishops, vicars and prefects apostolic, pious societies, groups of Catholic Action, Catholic universities, and many of the faithful quickly wrote expressing their desire to see Pius X proclaimed a saint without delay. Thus in a letter dated September 24, 1916, Msgr. Leo, Bishop of Nicotera and Tropea, speaks of “a great saint and a great pope.”

The flood of pilgrims was such that the Vatican crypt could no longer contain them all. As a result, Cardinal Merry del Val, archpriest of St. Peter’s Basilica, had a small metal cross set into the floor of the basilica so that the faithful might kneel down directly above the tomb. The cross bore the inscription Pius Papa X.

Cardinal Merry del Val, the former Secretary of State of Pope Pius X celebrated Holy Mass near the tomb on the 20th of every month, until February 20, 1930, when he did so for the last time–six days before his own death.   Click here to read more…

Comment: 

Do you agree with the Pope’s claim about weak Catholics?   Can there be any doubt?  Is there anything, in particular, in the above article which provides insights into the greatness of Pius X?  Share your thoughts…

Modern Catholics Discuss Liturgical Abuses in New Mass – You Just Couldn’t Make This Stuff Up…Honest!

Comment: 

This group takes too long to get into the discussion (at least five minutes) but once they get going, it’s very interesting indeed to hear them objecting to some of the very things which were defended and promoted by fellow-parishioners when some of us were doing the complaining.  It’s also interesting to see how the standards have shifted (mostly in a downward direction).  In the end, it dawns on Catholics who are truly thinking it all through, that there is no option but to move on to the traditional Mass – back to the future…  It seems clear that the growth is to be found where the traditional Latin Mass is being offered, so pray for the trio in the video. They obviously mean well.  I liked them as people – so much so that, but for the geography, I’d invite them out for Haggis and Neeps 😀

Anyway, in summary, below are the 15 things which the group in the video argue need to stop happening… or not;  there is some disagreement within the group which offers food for thought, not least because, notably, it is the priest [“Richard” or “Rich” as he seems to introduce himself] who does the disagreeing.  

Clapping (applause)

2 Too many Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion

3 Receiving from the Chalice (“cup”) when sick

4 Leaving seats at sign of peace to “share the peace” with people across the church

5 Socialising before (and after) Mass

6 Phone ringing 

7 Not donating

8 Leaving Mass early

9 Bad preaching (lack of “fire”, not inspiring or nourishing)  [worryingly, the priest in the video is open to laity, including women, preaching.)

10 Receiving Holy Communion in mortal sin

11 Dressing inappropriately – not dressing up for Mass

12 No sanctus bells 

13 Genuflecting to the altar when the Tabernacle is somewhere else

14 I couldn’t hear anything specific, but the conversation went on to discuss baptism/use of “lemonade” type jug  (If I’ve missed something, tell me in the comments…) 

15. Holding hands during Our Father

My own predominant  thought listening to the conversation was that any hope for the future in that diocese lies with the laity, as represented by the two lads on the video not the clergy, as represented by the [very nice and doubtless well-meaning]  priest in the video –  a manifestly modernist priest but one who likes Cardinal Ratzinger!  How much more confusing can this mess get! 

Share your thoughts – politely!  I’ll be posting the link to this thread on their YouTube channel, below the above video, to be precise., so don’t be too hard on these good souls, who are all far too young to have been taught the Faith properly.  They are typical New Catholics tailor made for the New Mass, the New Liturgy, the New Sacraments, the New Catechism, the New Rosary, the New Evangelisation, the New Morality, the New Politically Correct  Pontiff, the New Canonisations, the New Commandments (minus idolatry and adultery) … and the New – you name it.    

3/9: Feast of Pope Saint Pius X…

Pope Saint Pius X is one of the greatest of the Pope Saints in the Church’s calendar.  Reading about his love for Holy Mother Church is both edifying and exhilarating.  

His very first encyclical is outstanding and is equally applicable to today’s world as when the Pope Saint first penned it.  And, had his successors paid attention to his perhaps most famous encyclical, Pascendi On The Doctrine of the Modernists it is a safe bet that we would not be suffering the monumental Modernist crisis which is ruining the Faith of millions today.

There are many incidents from the life of this great saint which have clear importance for us today – and for the popes who have succeeded him.  The following is a case in point: 

From the St. Vincent Ferrer Foundation

As Pope, St. Pius X had to correct and reprimand several bishops and priests who had fallen into heresy or were flirting dangerously close to that edge. Some of the French prelates who supported the Sillon (a precursor to modern Liberation Theology) were particularly problematic.

One bishop who had been reprimanded continued to act against the Catholic Faith. Pope Pius X called him to Rome. When the bishop entered he made the customary genuflection before the Pope and waited to be acknowledged so he could rise. Pope Pius X remained busy at his desk ignoring the bishop for three quarters of an hour. This was a small penance which the saintly pontiff was imposing.

At last, Pope Pius raised his eyes and looked the bishop directly in the eyes, holding his gaze steady and stern. Without a word he rose and walked over to the kneeling figure. Then he greeted him: “Good morning, your Excellency.” Before the Bishop could arise, Pope Pius X swiftly removed the zucchetto from the Bishop’s head and placed it on the edge of his desk. He then dismissed him, “Have a good day, Father.” And that was the end of the meeting. No more words had to be spoken. This great pope had sent a very clear warning shot across the bow of the [Barque] of Peter letting all know what the fate would be of those bishops, successors to Judas, who refused to resist and denounce heresy. Ends.

Comment: 

One topic for discussion on this thread has to be, surely, that the next pope MUST be a man in the mould of Saint Pius X, who will demote bad bishops and appoint orthodox / traditional priests. Or, have things gone so far, that there can never be another pope in the mould of this great saint?  Would seminarians and young priests trained in our modernist seminaries, obey such a pontiff?  In any case, is there anyone in view at the moment, who is remotely likely to act with such authority, if elected to succeed Pope Francis The First – and we sincerely hope and pray – The Last?  It has to be, surely, a man with the mindset, of Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò who openly attributed the crisis (of clerical abuse/corruption in the hierarchy) to what he termed “the scourge of homosexuality”…

“To bear witness to corruption in the hierarchy of the Catholic Church was a painful decision for me, and remains so. But I am an old man, one who knows he must soon give an accounting to the Judge for his actions and omissions, one who fears Him who can cast body and soul into hell. A Judge who, even in his infinite mercy, will render to every person salvation or damnation according to what he has deserved. Anticipating the dreadful question from that Judge — ‘How could you, who had knowledge of the truth, keep silent in the midst of falsehood and depravity?’ – what answer could I give?” (+ Carlo Maria Viganò, in his testimony alleging widespread cover-up of sexual abuse within the Church, up to, and including Pope Francis – widely reported and quoted across the internet.)  

Finally, feel free to post any other incident from the life of the Saint, which impresses you.  Edification – as well as education – is a key aim of this thread, so check out the St Vincent Ferrer Foundation here Or share any other sources that you may find. 

3rd September: Feast of Pope St Pius X…

Read (or, for now, simply dip into) two key texts for our times: firstly, the landmark encyclical of Pope Saint Pius X Pascendi (on the doctrine of the Modernists) and Archbishop Lefebvre’s Open Letter to Confused Catholics  and then share your thoughts. 

And consider this: the Pontifical High Mass in the Parish of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Balornock, Glasgow, offered by Cardinal Burke at noon today, would not have taken place but for the self-sacrifice of Archbishop Lefebvre, who refused to stand by and permit the ancient Mass to be destroyed in the name of the Vatican II “reforms”.  

To the Archbishop, in fact,  do we owe the Masses now available all over the world, which resulted from Pope Benedict’s Apostolic Letter, given Motu Proprio (on his own initiative/by his own hand), Summorum Pontificum issued in July, 2007. This Motu Proprio was issued  to fulfil a condition of the Bishops of Archbishop Lefebvre’s Society of St Pius X , who insisted that all priests must be permitted to offer the Traditional Latin Mass without any pressure from their bishops, before they, the SSPX bishops,  would resume talks aimed at ending their current “irregular” situation within the Church.  One wonders just how many of those attending Cardinal Burke’s Pontifical High Mass today, and, no doubt, marvelling at its beauty, realise that fact. 

How likely, too, is it that the organisers, or any of the priests in attendance – let alone the Cardinal himself – would remark on this key fact, in all of their conversation about the beauty of the ancient rite of Mass, and the wonder of having it available to the faithful once again, after so many years when it was effectively (and illicitly) prohibited.  

Far, far from our priests be the love of novelty! – Pope Pius X

 

Comments invited…

Pope Francis Causing Catholics To Leave The Church – Can YOU Help Them?

worriedmanI’ve had a number of telephone conversations recently, today included, with very worried Catholics who are either losing the Faith themselves or who know others who are losing the Faith, because of the scandalous things Pope Francis is saying and doing. Some of these people made the mistake of “investigating” (i.e. searching online) for answers and, needless to say, some of them are now toying with all the wrong “answers” – notably sedevacantism. 

In all honestly, I have scant patience with some of these people (and said so) because they apparently failed to notice the modernism of each of Pope Francis’ predecessors. Pope Francis did not appear out of the blue – each of the post-Vatican II popes prepared the path for him to take the Church by storm, so it is irksome to see the new “converts” to the battle against modernism turn the fight into a battle against Christ’s Church. Significantly, some of these new “converts” are relatively recent “converts” from their novus ordo parishes to the SSPX. It is, therefore, twice as concerning to see them risking their souls by entertaining the “anti-pope”, “anti-Christ”, sedevacantist false “answers” to the current scandalous pontificate. Instead of doing their duty as Soldiers of Christ in the battle against modernism,  they become part of the problem, not part of the solution. 

In these contacts with worried Catholics, I’ve given as much Church history as it is possible to squeeze into a couple of hours of conversation and I’ve quoted  St Vincent de Lerins, in order to demonstrate the correct Catholic response to a bad pope, which is to resist his errors and cling to “antiquity” – that is, to Catholic Tradition – while never doubting that Christ has kept His promise to be with His Church until the end of time. Christ assured us that the gates of Hell will never prevail. He made no promise that the gates of Hell will never attack the Church, just that they will never prevail.  I get the feeling, though, that there’s always something more to say, which is where you lot come into the frame…

Explain – in as few words as possible – how you would advise those Catholic who are sorely tempted to abandon the Church and go it alone  – Catholicism to go, so to speak. Provide the links to articles or videos that you think will help, and, of course, pray for all Catholics who are tempted to doubt at this time.  I plan to send the link to this thread to all those online readers who have contacted me in recent times, in the hope that they find it helpful. 

Finally, please pray for Pope Francis who will one day be held to account by God, and made to pay for his dereliction of duty, for the scandal he is causing and for the souls which may be lost because of his false teaching.  His beloved God of Surprises is, as things stand, more likely to have a few shocks than surprises in store for him at his Judgment, so we do need to pray very hard indeed – and urgently – for the conversion of Pope Francis. 

OurLadyofFatima

Our Lady of Fatima, pray for us!

 

Paisley Diocese: Church Vs Christ – Schismatic Call To Revolution…

Blogger, Petrus, a member of the Diocese of Paisley, submitted the following article on the schismatic rumblings lurking in the final document published at the conclusion of  the recent diocesan meeting of malcontents aka diocesan “synod”. 

 

Pope Francis wants the Church to stop what it has been doing and make a fresh start. He is calling for a revolution in our thinking and acting. We have to stop trying to save the Church and instead try to spread the Gospel.

Pope Francis wants the Church to stop what it has been doing and make a fresh start. He is calling for a revolution in our thinking and acting. We have to stop trying to save the Church and instead try to spread the Gospel. (From the Final Document, Diocesan Synod)

 

On becoming Bishop of Paisley, Bishop John Keenan announced that he would hold a Diocesan Synod on the “New Evangelisation”.  I emailed the bishop with these recommendations to before the synod:

  • The faithful should receive Holy Communion kneeling and on the tongue.
  • Only the priest should distribute the Blessed Sacrament.
  • Restore the practice of altar servers being exclusively male given that there is a strong link between serving on the altar and vocations to the priesthood.
  • Restore Latin to the liturgy in every parish.
  • Weekly benediction of the blessed Sacrament and parish Rosary in every parish.
  • Consecrate the Diocese of Paisley to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

I’ve just read Bishop Keenan’s reply, saying this was music to his ears! However, there’s not a mention of these things in the final document, which has just been published.  The document is scandalous. I have provided the worst quotes from the report below.

Anyone wishing to read the entire document will find it here

The centre piece of the publication is the Diocesan Charter:

Paisley Diocesan Charter

 The Diocese of Paisley, with the guidance of the Holy Spirit and through the patronage of Our Lady of Paisley, will work towards being a faith filled community where:

  • There is a commitment to effective evangelisation centred on a personal relationship with Jesus Christ and a life lived with faith and charity.
  • Faith formation and active discipleship are of fundamental importance in developing the ‘Role of the Laity in the New Evangelisation’ within our parish and diocesan communities.
  • There is dynamic and collaborative engagement among all those called through Baptism into the family of God to use their gifts and talents to build up the body of Christ in an atmosphere of mutual respect.
  • All families feel welcome when they enter the church for liturgies, sacramental preparation or for support of any kind.
  • Youth are valued as bringing life to the Church.
  • There is a commitment to reach out to all of society, in particular those who feel excluded, offering witness to our belief that each person, made in the image and likeness of God, is deserving of dignity and respect.
  • The structures of the Diocese are designed to meet the needs of the diverse communities that they serve.
  • Each parish grows as a welcoming family of faith and each member of the parish community feels they belong and have something to contribute.
  • Communication in all its components: the message, the medium and the language, is understood as central to the success of the church in the modern era.
  • We actively use communication to promote the gospel message of peace and reconciliation.   END

As readers will no doubt note, this could be used in any denomination and nothing marks this out as Catholic.

As we move into the main body of the document I will simply provide the worst of what is a completely non-Catholic publication:

“Pope Francis wants the Church to stop what it has been doing and make a fresh start.  He is calling for a revolution in our thinking and acting.  We have to stop trying to save the Church and instead try to spread the Gospel.”

“The Fathers of the Second Vatican Council thought that the laity had become too passive or secondary as members in the Church, not much more than the ‘long arm’ of the clergy.  They had not been afforded their own proper dignity, vocation and responsibility. “

“New evangelisation is ecumenical. New evangelisation sees Catholics, Protestants and Evangelicals working together in the world, passing on the central Christian message.”

“Our Church is tired and too introverted to change.  Many practising  Catholics see the Church like belonging to a spiritual club that exists for the personal benefit of its members.”

There then follows a section on the feedback the bishop received as he went round the Diocese prior to the synod.  This is obviously feedback the bishop sympathises with (there’s no mention of the feedback I provided).

  1. “We need a new Pentecost. Our Pentecostal brethren are strong and we can learn from them.”
  2. “We can learn from Pentecostal services which are different every week. The young find Mass boring. We need to find different ways of celebrating it in order to convert them.”
  3. “Those who cannot go to Holy Communion should be addressed. The Church is conflicted on the GAY issue. They perceive themselves to be judged.  No-one asked them what their life is like.  The Church needs to look at how it treats GAYs and the marginalised.  The trials of life take people away, e.g. divorce. So they do not feel part of the Church. This means we lose the parents and we lose the children.  What can we do about this?  Is it structural?  Also policies must include others.  We should ask priests to apologise to those who now no longer feel part of the Church.”
  4. “How about an ecumenical Praise in the Park? As a young person I am really encouraged by this forward-thinking approach of innovation but I can understand the issues other are raising.  We all have to look forward progressively.  We cannot worry about the past but must now make the diocese better.  This may be uncomfortable but remember the aim, a better, stronger diocese. “
  1. “We need to listen to the perspective of the young. Evangelical churches set up creative ways to bring Christ alive for children.  We can learn from them. “
  2. “We need to focus on the Holy Spirit and work with Pentecostal groups, like Healing Rooms. We are losing our Catholics to them.  There are no barriers at ground level to ecumenical work.  We are just brothers who love Jesus.   How does the ecumenical dimension tie into our renewal?  We need to be with other Christians as churches and communities together.  Can we not learn from other faiths?  We have a lot to learn from evangelical communities.  Ecumenism has often been formal and top down.  It would be good for it to be at ground level.  We can learn much from interfaith.”
  3. “Encouraging boys to serve at the altar is one way of promoting vocations although it would need to avoid the perception of sexism or the criticism of not learning anything from recent scandals. Young people should not be exclusively identified with boys and too much emphasis need not be placed on gender. Female servers, in fact, encourages vocations to the religious life and serving at the altar is a way for all young people to grow in their faith and prepare to live their Catholic vocation as married, single or religious.”  END        

I think in terms of renewing the Diocese of Paisley this synod and final publication has zero chance of making any meaningful impact. In fact, there’s really nothing Catholic about this at all.    Signed… Petrus.

Comment

Before he was announced as the new Bishop of Paisley, “Father John Keenan” was repeatedly described to me as “on our side”, an “orthodox” priest. This despite the fact that he showed absolutely no sign whatsoever of being orthodox, no interest in our work. He presumably pretended to be “on our side” but I never once heard from him – like every other career-priest in Scotland, he ignored us.  Then, too, there was the inconvenient fact that, as Catholic chaplain at Glasgow University, he permitted one dissenter after another to use the chaplaincy as a platform to spread their anti-Catholicism and adversely influence students. He would  bleat that he really couldn’t do anything about it, when one of the Catholic Truth team would ring him to ask him to prevent this latest scandal.  

So, now, here we have him in full blown dissent – not from Pope Francis, of course (that would be virtually impossible) but in dissent from Catholic teaching which decrees that to separate Christ from His Church is heresy.  As Cardinal Newman put it, “…the Catholic Church IS the Christian dispensation”.  Catholicism IS Christianity. Yet, Bishop Keenan urges us to learn from “our Pentecostal brethren” (Protestant extremists, albeit well-meaning individuals) and to scrap the Church (in accordance with Pope Francis’ desire) in order to start afresh.  Now, about THAT they can certainly learn from the Protestants. They’ve been starting new churches since Luther, Knox & Company started the bandwagon rolling way back in the Middle Ages.  The writer of the Final Document appears not to have noticed the irony in the the remark that “we are losing our Catholics to Pentecostal groups” – and I doubt if Bishop Keenan will recognise all the irony, all the NON-Catholicity in each and every sentiment of that awful document. Let’s hope it’s actually NOT the “final” document – or Paisley is doomed. 

Now, don’t tell me that this is just a diocesan synod and so  these suggestions probably came from lay people, or some dissenting clergy.  Who cares?  That would simply serve to underline the Bishop’s negligence, his dereliction of duty. You read Petrus’s suggestions, entirely in keeping with Catholic Tradition; if Bishop Keenan is so “orthodox” (yeah right)  why didn’t he clutch at those suggestions  as a drowning man clutches at the proverbial straw?  

It’s the Bishop’s job to act as shepherd, keeping the faithful on the right path. If the Bishop had truly lamented the errors, the modernist spirit, in which his synod was clearly steeped,  he should have closed it down and sent the revolutionaries home. Fleas in ears, springs to mind. 

Do you see why Our Lord warned us to beware of false prophets? Do you recognise Bishop Keenan as a shepherd in wolves’ clothing?  Can you see why he – and his ilk – is heading for Hell?  If not, visit Specsavers.  One thing is clear: if you want to save your soul, avoid Paisley Diocese like the plague.

And about that “revolution”… buy yourself a copy of the Catechism of the Council of Trent. That way, you really will revolutionise your Faith and start afresh [your spiritual life, NOT “The Church”].  We’re called to sanctify ourselves. That’s our essential Catholic vocation. We are called to change ourselves. We are  NOT called to change the Church.

Let’s hear your verdict on the Paisley synod.   

A Tale of Two Priests & Two Masses

From America Magazine…

An ordinary Sunday morning. No parish assignment, no preaching. So I decide to go to a church that celebrates the Latin Mass every Sunday at 11 AM. I knew it would be in Latin, but I wasn’t sure if it would be the old Tridentine or new post-Vatican II Latin Mass. Clearly it was Tridentine! One reason to attend was to see if I could feel comfortable being the main celebration of the Latin Mass.  

A female altar server assists at a Mass celebrated by Cardinal O’Malley in 2013.Pilot file photo/ Gregory L. Tracy

A female altar server assists at a novus ordo Mass celebrated by Cardinal O’Malley in 2013.

The church was half-filled, older men and women, some families with children, and a number of people in their 30’s who followed with their missals. The music, all in Latin, was in abundance with 90 percent sung by the choir and little by the congregation. The opening procession included 8 servers in surplices (all male), an assistant to the priest and the main celebrant…

REACTIONS. During the celebration I felt very uncomfortable. It was strange and foreign. Even though I was very familiar with the Tridentine Mass from my childhood, it seemed remote and distant. The Mass seemed to focus on the priest whose words for the most part could not be heard (they were in Latin anyway!) and who rarely faced the people. The choir performed well and their singing overrode the priest, who had to wait several times until they finished singing.

In my mind I could not but think back to the Second Vatican Council, and all that the Council and subsequent documents tried to bring about – active participation, emphasis on the important things, vernacular, elimination of accretions and repetitions, etc. It was sad and disheartening. What happened? Why would the Catholic faithful seek out and attend this older form of the Mass? Is the Tridentine Mass an aberration? What does it say about the reforms of Vatican II?

After the Mass, I was tempted to talk with some of those present. But I decided not to as I feared I would have been negative and perhaps controversial. My feelings were still very raw. One thing I know: I myself will never freely choose to celebrate the Tridentine Mass.  Click here to read article in full

From Traditional Catholic Priest (Blog)…

Constantly I hear from people that they do not go to the Latin Mass because they do not understand Latin.  (Some even think that the homily is in Latin.)  So please, just for now, let us put aside the argument of the language; Latin or English and go to the prayers and actions that are part of the rubrics of the two masses.  Let us also look at who is the center of focus and the way the people participate, dress and receive God in Holy Communion at the two masses. 

Traditional (Latin) Mass

Traditional (Latin) Mass

As a priest, I want to re-clarify what are the differences on how Jesus is treated in the two masses.   This will be from my own stand point as a priest who has for years celebrated the New Mass in English and Spanish, and now, for the last 7 years offered the Ancient Holy Sacrifice of the Mass…

From my view up on the altar, the difference between the Ancient Mass and the New Mass is like day and night.  Archbishop Sample, from Portland Oregon, put it well when he said at the Sacra Liturgia Conference in Rome, that he wants all of his priests to learn and offer the Latin Mass because of the effect it has on them understanding their role as priests.  He said that offering the Holy Latin Mass has changed him completely and now he finally understands the sacrificial aspect of his priesthood..

As a priest who says the New Mass and the Latin Mass, the Latin Mass has by far more rubrics built right into the Latin Mass to protect the Body and Blood of Jesus from being desecrated in any manner.  It clearly has the strong sacrificial component of the Holy Mass and priesthood.  It does not have the protestant emphasis on the Last Supper and “doing this in remembrance of Me” like the Luther advocated.  It also has prayers and gestures that facilitate more easily the adoration that Jesus deserves from us His creatures.  And because of this, the Latin Mass pleases God way more than the New Mass. Click here to read article in full

 

Comments invited – how did YOU vote in the poll: and why?

17/10: Feast of the “First Fridays’ Saint”!

SAINT MARGARET MARY ALACOQUE, VIRGIN—1690  Feast: October 17

In seventeenth-century France the faith of the people had been badly shaken; there was rebellion against the Church and neglect of its teachings; the rise of Protestantism and the spread of the heresy of Jansenism[1] both had a part in the weakening of the structure built up through the ages. But as every threat brings its response, so now there rose up fresh, strong forces to counter these trends. Three famous religious, who are today venerated as saints, were particularly effective: John Eudes and Claude de la Columbiere were French Jesuit priests and writers; Margaret Mary Alacoque was a simple nun of the order of the Visitation. Their special work was to popularize the devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. To represent this trio and this movement, we have chosen Margaret Mary Alacoque.  

Click on image to read the 12 Promises of the Sacred Heart

Click on image to read the 12 Promises of the Sacred Heart

She was born in 1647 at Janots, a small town of Burgundy, the fifth of seven children, of Claude and Philiberte Alacoque. Her father was a prosperous notary; the family owned a country house and farmland, and had some aristocratic connections. Margaret’s godmother was a neighbor, the Countess of Corcheval. As a small child Margaret spent a great deal of time with her, but these visits were brought to a sudden end by the death of the countess. The father died of pneumonia when Margaret was about eight, and this was another severe shock to the little girl. Claude had loved his family dearly but had been short-sighted and extravagant. His death put them in hard straits. However, Margaret was sent to school with the Urbanist Sisters at Charolles. She loved the peace and order of the convent life, and the nuns were so impressed by her devotion that she was allowed to make her First Communion at the age of nine. A rheumatic affliction kept her bedridden for four years. During this time she was brought home, where some of her father’s relatives had moved in and taken over the direction of the farm and household. She and her mother were disregarded, and treated almost as servants. This painful situation grew more acute after Margaret’s recovery, for the relatives tried to regulate all her comings and goings. Not allowed to attend church as often as she pleased, the young girl was sometimes seen weeping and praying in a corner of the garden. It grieved her deeply that she could not ease things for her mother. Her eldest brother’s coming of age saved the day, for the property now reverted to him, and the family again had undisputed possession of their home.

Philiberte expressed a hope that Margaret would marry; the girl considered the step, inflicting severe austerities upon herself during a period of indecision. At the age of twenty, inspired by a vision, she put aside all such thoughts and resolved to enter a convent. While awaiting admission, she tried to help and teach certain neglected children of the village. At twenty-two she made her profession at the convent of the Visitation at Paray-le-Monial. The nuns of the Order of the Visitation, founded in the early years of the seventeenth century by St. Francis de Sales, were famed for their humility and selflessness. As a novice Margaret excelled in these virtues. When she made her profession, the name of Mary was added and she was called Margaret Mary. She began a course of mortifications and penances which were to continue, with more or less intensity, as long as she lived. We are told that she was assigned to the infirmary and was not very skillful at her tasks.

Some years passed quietly in the convent, and then Margaret Mary began to have experiences which seemed to be of supernatural origin. The first of these occurred on December 27, 1673, when she was kneeling at the grille in the chapel. She felt suffused by the Divine Presence, and heard the Lord inviting her to take the place which St. John had occupied at the Last Supper. The Lord told her that the love of His heart must spread and manifest itself to men, and He would reveal its graces through her. This was the beginning of a series of revelations covering a period of eighteen months. When Margaret Mary went to the Superior, Mother de Saumaise, with an account of these mystical experiences, claiming that she, an humble nun, had been chosen as the transmitter of a new devotion to the Sacred Heart, she was reprimanded for her presumption. Seriously overwrought, Margaret Mary suffered a collapse, and became so ill that her life was despaired of. Now the Mother Superior reflected that she might have erred in scorning the nun’s story and vowed that if her life were spared, she would take it as a sign that the visions and messages were truly from God. When Margaret Mary recovered, the Superior invited some theologians who happened to be in the town -they included a Jesuit and a Benedictine-to hear the story. These priests listened and judged the young nun to be a victim of delusions. Their examination had been a sheer torture to Margaret Mary. Later a Jesuit, Father Claude de la Columbiere, talked to her and was completely convinced of the genuineness of the revelations. He was to write of the nun and to inaugurate this devotion in England.

For many years the nun suffered from despair, from self-inflicted punishments, and also from the slights and contempt of those around her. In 1681 Father Claude returned to the convent and died there the following year. Margaret Mary was appointed assistant and novice-mistress by a new Mother Superior who was more sympathetic towards her. Opposition ceased-or at least was restrained-after an account of Margaret Mary’s visions was read aloud in the refectory from the writings left by Father Claude, who had taken it upon himself to make known to the world the nun’s remarkable experiences. That she was finally vindicated was to her a matter of indifference. When she was forty-three, while serving a second term as assistant superior, Margaret Mary fell ill. Sinking rapidly, she received the Last Sacraments, saying, “I need nothing but God, and to lose myself in the heart of Jesus.”

Although the devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus was practised before this time, it now gained a strong new impetus through the work of Father John Eudes and the writings of Father Claude. The Sacred Heart is regarded as “the symbol of that boundless love which moved the Word to take flesh, to institute the Holy Eucharist, to take our sins upon Himself, and, dying on the Cross, to offer Himself as a victim and sacrifice to the eternal Father.” The cult first became popular in France, then spread to Poland and other countries, including, at a later period, the United States. The first petition to the Holy See for the institution of the feast was from Queen Mary, consort of James II of England. The month of June is appointed for this devotion, and since 1929 the feast has been one of the highest rank.  Source

Comment

I sometimes wonder if there are  many modern Catholics who still value devotions such as the Nine First Fridays.  Does anyone know?  What about the Catholics in your circle of family and friends – do they ever mention “doing the First Fridays”?  Do the diocesan priests ever preach about this devotion? Have YOU made the Nine First Fridays? If not, why not?

3/9: Feast of Pope St Pius X…

Joseph Sarto was born in Riese in Venetia on Jun 2nd, 1835. He was successively curate, parish priest, Bishop of Mantua, patriarch of Venice. He was elected Pope on August 4, 1903.  As chief pastor of the Church he realised to the full the value of the liturgy as the prayer of the Church and spared no effort to propagate the practice of frequent and daily Communion. In his encyclical Pascendi Domini Gregis, he exposed and condemned the modernist heresy with force and clarity (1907). He died on  August 20, 1914 and was canonised on May 29, 1954.  (From 1962, Missal, Feast of St Pius X, Pope. Confessor)

PopeSaintPiusXfaceblackandwhite

Comments invited, with a suggestion to pray to this great Pope-Saint for the present Modernist Pope, Francis.