Sat 23/5/20: Education Seminar…

The Challenge of Educating Catholics to be Soldiers of Christ
in a World of “Equality & Diversity” – Fight or Flight?

Father Sebastian Wall SSPX

Passing on the Faith…

St John Ogilvie (Scottish Martyr) –
Model “Soldier of Christ”
for Catholic Youth Today

PLUS

Panel of teachers and pupils, past and present, to discuss key issues affecting Catholic schools today.


AND

Audience participation, as always at our meetings, guarantees a very lively conversation…

Saturday, 23 May, 2020, 10am – 4.30pm 

Rutherglen Town Hall, 139 Main Street, Rutherglen, G73 2JJ
(South Lanarkshire, outskirts of Glasgow city centre).

There are a number of free car parks around the Town Hall,
and there is a very good public transport system.

The seminar will be informal, with opportunities for everyone to share their experiences of Catholic schools.   Leading the conversation will be teachers, pupils (past and present), and parents.  Some Home-educating families will exhibit some of their resources and will answer questions about the practicalities of home-schooling. 

Entry:  £20 / Concession £10  (senior citizens, students, unwaged), which includes tea/coffee/biscuits morning and afternoon, and a light lunch:  soup, sandwiches, tea and coffee. 

If you wish to book to stay on for the evening meal, this will be served at 6pm approximately.  Menu: Golden lentil soup served with a dinner roll, Traditional steak pie; tender iced beef topped with puff pastry served with chef’s selection of potatoes and vegetables. Traditional apple pie served with cream.  Teac, coffee and dinner mints – £34.50 per head, incl. VAT.  A vegetarian option will be available. Please inform of any dietary requirements.  Bar available throughout. Please add your meal(s) payment when paying to attend the Seminar.  All monies must be paid by Friday, 1 May, 2020.  Cheques should be made payable to Catholic Truth and posted to Catholic Truth, PO Box 30017, Glasgow, G67 9FS. Or, to pay by bank transfer, write to the above address (with return address for us to reply)- or email editor@catholictruthscotland.com – to ask for our bank details. 

Registration/morning tea, coffee, biscuits, will be at 10am, followed by the Rosary at 10.30.a.m, when the Seminar will begin.  Please attend promptly to register.  

Note: as always at our events, there will be no entry without a pre-booked ticket;  email tickets are available, but if you prefer a ticket by mail, please email your postal details to editor@catholictruthscotland.com – Cheques to be made payable to Catholic Truth.  If writing to book, please contact us at Catholic Truth, PO Box 30017, Glasgow, G67 9FS.

Feel free to ask questions or to offer your ideas in the comments below.
Tell us, for example if there are particular issues which you would like to have included in the Seminar discussions. 

Jesus or the Church? 

New video in our series Thinking Through Catholic Truth (updated 18 July, 2018)

If you can think of other arguments to convince lapsed and non-Catholics about the divine roots of the Church, please share your thoughts below…

Is The Christian Institute Anti-Catholic?

From the website of The Christian Institute…

In 1523 London could number its citizens by the thousands, its crimes by the hundreds and its places of worship by the scores.

Men and women wandered past the religious institutions which held them in superstition and fear. They had no knowledge of the word of God which was withheld from them in Latin by the Church.

Just 15 years later, the Bible was being distributed in English to churches across the land. God’s word would be freely accessible to every man, woman and child who could read or be read to.

This revolutionary change was the focus of our third Autumn Lecture last night, brought to us by Brian Edwards, author and former president of the Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches (FIEC).

Edwards explained that the English Bible we read today can largely be credited to the work of one man, used by God – William Tyndale.

Reformation minded

Tyndale was probably born in Gloucestershire in 1491. By 1506, he was studying at Magdalen College, Oxford, before being ordained into the priesthood of the Church of England.

Concerned with the theology of his Oxford colleagues, he is thought to have transferred to Cambridge around 1519. Here he was among a score of upcoming reformers who were discussing the ideas of the Reformation and the work of a certain German monk by the name of Martin Luther.

In 1521, he crossed swords with a local friar who, following a heated debate, exclaimed: ‘we’d be better off without God’s law than the law of the Pope’.

Tyndale replied: “I defy the Pope and all his laws. If God spare my life ere many years, I will cause the boy that drives the plow to know more of the Scriptures than you!”
Thus began Tyndale’s life’s work – translating the Bible into the language of the common people.

Exile

This at a time when it was forbidden for a person to read the Bible in English without a priest’s permission and people were burned at the stake for teaching others the Lord’s Prayer in English.

Tyndale fled England. In 1524 he travelled to Hamburg and then to Cologne, and by 1525 he was starting to print the New Testament in English, before copies were smuggled back to England on German merchant ships.

Amidst barrels of grain were thousands of English New Testaments, available for the price of a load of hay.

Lasting influence

Skilled in Hebrew, Greek, Latin and several other languages, the accuracy of Tyndale’s rendering has been commended by experts.

But he aimed to communicate the Gospel, not just translate, and in the foreword to his New Testament, he urged readers to repent and trust in Christ for themselves.

Medieval historian Ian Mortimer describes Tyndale as, “the only writer in the English language more influential than Shakespeare”. Many of his phrases remain in language today and he introduced new terms including “scapegoat” and “Exodus”.

By 1530, his translation of the Pentateuch had arrived in England. But King Henry declared that Tyndale’s books should be burned and punishment doled out to owners. Tyndale was a hunted man, constantly on the lookout for King Henry’s agents.

Martyred

Early in the summer of 1535, Tyndale was betrayed by his friend Henry Phillips who invited him to lunch and then ambushed him. He was imprisoned outside Brussels for a year, accused of heresy.

In September 1536, William Tyndale, England’s greatest Bible translator was chained to a stake, partially strangled and then burned.

His final words are said to have been: ‘Lord, open the King of England’s eyes’.

God’s word for all

Tyndale’s prayer was answered in that a short time later the Great Bible – based on the work of Tyndale – was presented to Henry VIII and approved for distribution to churches across England.

Brian Edwards concluded: “Tyndale’s legacy is in the pages of every English Bible you ever pick up”.   Source – Christian Institute

Comment:

The above article from the Christian Institute website is classic Protestant Propaganda.  Click here to read an academic rebuttal of the Protestant view of the Bible, which was butchered, literally, by the Protestant revolutionaries in the Middle Ages. Far from upholding the Scriptures as the Word of God, the “reformers” removed those books which, a cynic might say, were too Catholic for them – notably, books which contain the roots of Catholic doctrines (e.g. Purgatory – Maccabees).   See short (2 minutes) video clip below..

Share your thoughts on the blatant propaganda published by the Christian Institute, which is an organisation respected for its work in addressing political correctness in the moral sphere. It has led the fight against the Named Person Scheme in Scotland. Thus,  Catholics, myself included, have supported its work – but this might prove to be  a game-changer.  Or perhaps you disagree?  Speak your mind! 

November: Month of the Holy Souls…

Launched to mark the Feast of All Souls Day, 2nd November,  this thread is to allow us to share our favourite prayers, novenas and hymns for the benefit of the Holy Souls.  Praying for the dead is a tradition firmly rooted in Sacred Scripture:  “It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins.” (2 Machabees 12:46)

Feel free too, to ask questions and offer comments on any related issues – for example, Purgatory.