Glasgow Pride: Priest Under Fire For Prayer of Reparation – Bravo, Father! 

 Below, report in Evening Times, dated 17 July, 2018, with Catholic Truth editorial comment in blue, italicised throughout. 

Fr Mark Morris

A CATHOLIC chaplain of a Glasgow university has held a service to atone for the “gross offence” of Pride Glasgow.
Ed: well, thanks be to God that there was at least one act of reparation for this “pride in our sin” parade through our city, in flat contradiction to the city motto which is “Let Glasgow flourish by the preaching of Thy word and the praising of Thy name.”

Father Mark Morris, of Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church, last night invited parishioners to a rosary of reparation.
Ed: bravo, Father!

According [to] the Balornock church’s website, the service was a “Rosary of reparation for the gross offence to God which is Pride Glasgow.”
Ed: bravo, Father!

Saturday’s Pride march was led by First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, who called the event “celebrating and reaffirming the values of tolerance, diversity, equality, love and respect.”
Ed: there should never be any celebration and reaffirming of sin, especially in a city bearing a motto of dedication to  Christ: “Let Glasgow flourish by the preaching of Thy word and the praising of Thy name.”

But last night Father Morris, who is the Catholic chaplain of Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU), held a service offering decades of the Rosary, Litany and Benediction in reparation for the LGBTQI+ event.
Edthus providing an opportunity for all concerned to affirm their stated devotion to the “values of tolerance, diversity, blah blah…”

Jordan Daly, Co-Founder of Time for Inclusive Education (TIE), which campaigns for inclusive education in schools, said it was “sad and disappointing” to see Father Morris’s “condemnation” of the event.
Ed: why on earth is it “sad and disappointing” to see a priest upholding Catholic moral teaching?  Would you prefer that he lacked integrity and praised what any Catholic worthy of the name knows to be a grave offence against God – objectively, a sin deadly to the soul? I thought the whole idea was that in our “inclusive” society we can “celebrate” and “tolerate” ALL views, beliefs blah blah?  Yeah, right. 

He said: “The Pride parade was, as always, a vibrant and colourful display of diversity, acceptance, and inclusivity.
Ed:  not in my experience.  These “pride” parades comprise a procession of half-naked people, cavorting and being sexually provocative in their behaviour. Not nice, to put it mildly. If that’s “a display of diversity blah blah” you can keep it.   

“The ethos of the parade is equality and love, so it is sad and disappointing to see that Father Morris has countered those fundamental values by holding this service and allowing a narrative of exclusion and condemnation to enter the mainstream as a result.”
Ed:  superficial junk-think. These terms are flung around without any definitions being offered.  Equal to whom?  What KIND of “love”?  The LGBT etc agenda is dominating the conversation and we are not allowed to ask these questions. Let anyone call this sin a sin, and pray in reparation, as Fr Morris has done (to his eternal credit), and he is accused of conducting a “narrative of exclusion and condemnation”.  From junk-think to  junk-speak.

Father Morris celebrates Mass on Thursdays in the Faith and Belief Centre in the university’s William Harley Building, and hears confession.
A spokesman for the Catholic Church in Glasgow said: “This was a private parish devotion unrelated to Father Morris’s role as chaplain.”
Ed what a dereliction of duty.  How DARE this “spokesman” for the Catholic Church in Glasgow, whoever he is, fail to point out that Father is doing no more than his duty as a Catholic priest in praying for and making reparation for serious sin. And, furthermore, that he is always a priest, whether in his parish or in a university or any other place where he is appointed to BE a priest for the people in that place.  Just WHO is this spokesman?  Ronnie Convery?  Doesn’t he know that the Archbishop of Glasgow, when he was appointed to the Diocese of Paisley, condemned the LGBT etc lobby outright and urged us all to be prepared to go to prison rather than remain silent or support this evil?  Has Mr Convery forgotten this wee detail? How typically convenient. 

A spokesman for the university said GCU is fully inclusive.
Ed: well, what’s the problem?  Why are you so annoyed at Fr Morris, or does “inclusivity” just mean you include LGBT etc people and their supporters?  Nobody else is “included” in your “inclusivity”?

He said: “The university is strongly inclusive.
Ed:  You’ve still not explained what this means – IS Fr Morris included in this “inclusivity” or not? 

“We respect and promote equality and diversity.
Ed: no you don’t. Otherwise you would respect Fr Morris’s right to hold any kind of prayer event he wishes, in his own parish. 

“This includes an official presence at the last two Pride Glasgow events.”
Ed:  it’s the norm, now,  to be politically correct, toeing the LGBT etc propaganda line, to go with the flow. Few challenge it. Group-think rules. To quote G. K. Chesterton: “A dead thing can go with the stream, but only a living thing can go against it.”

But Jordan added: “We are concerned about the message that this could send to the young people of Glasgow Caledonian University, and so would like to stress that these predictable voices of opposition are becoming increasingly drowned out by a Catholic and wider faith community which is supportive of LGBT equality.
Ed:  Jordan’s “concern” doesn’t say much about two things; firstly, the quality of students at Glasgow Caledonian University, who apparently can’t be exposed to any thinking person who goes against the establishment/popular view in society, and secondly, the Catholic community which, if it is “supportive of LGBT etc equality” is about as Catholic as the nearest Church of Scotland congregation.  There were Catholics like those at the time of the Reformation. They were called Protestants then, and that is what they are now – protesting the teaching of the Catholic Church, in this case, on sexual morality. 

“There were many people of faith who attended the Parade this weekend and in our efforts to advance LGBT-inclusive education in schools, we have been strongly supported by numerous Catholic Priests and their parishioners, as well as Church of Scotland and Scottish Episcopal Church ministers.
Ed:  that is utterly scandalous.  Faithful Catholics have a right to know the names of priests who “strongly support” LGBT etc education in schools. Their hypocrisy and duplicity must be exposed. They are living a lie, and stealing from parishioners who are donating to parish funds in the belief that their priests at least believe the doctrines of the Faith in their entirety. 

“Our experience working with the Scottish Catholic Education Service as part of the Scottish Government’s LGBT Inclusive Education Working Group has also been nothing but positive and productive.
Ed: again, that is scandalous, but we have known this for a while, thanks to the SCES openly boasting about the “safe spaces” they are making available for “gay” pupils in Catholic schools. 

“We know that those who support the LGBT community outweigh those who endorse intolerance and I imagine that the number of attendees to this service in contrast with those who attended the Pride parade would further prove that.”
Ed: now, you do have a point there. Thanks to the loss of divine and Catholic Faith within the Scottish hierarchy, which has trickled down to the majority of the clergy, there are now so few Catholics left in Glasgow that there are plans afoot to close and merge umpteen formerly thriving parish churches.  One day, however, these bishops and priests will be called to account for their negligence, for allowing themselves to be so seduced by worldliness that they actually fell into apostasy.  What a price, then, to pay. 

NUS Scotland’s LGBT+ Officer Kai O’Doherty added: “NUS Scotland is proud to be at the forefront of breaking down barriers facing LGBT+ people.
Ed: now there’s an original mantra…

“Universities should be a place where every student, regardless of religion, sexuality, or identity, feels accepted and supported to study without fear of discrimination.
Ed: even students who disapprove of same-sex activity?  Really?  I’ve heard stories galore of students being harassed and insulted for just expressing a contrary view on social media. In one case, the student had to take flight to Spain to complete her studies! No, tolerance really isn’t a hallmark of this whole LGBT etc juggernaut. 

“Everybody within our university communities has a duty to ensure that campuses are compatible with the accepting and progressive culture that they strive to achieve.
“We’re proud of the progress that has been made, but every day we are reminded of how far we still have to go to achieve a truly inclusive society.”
Ed: more junk-think but note:  anyone who is not in favour of the “progressive culture” (where every sin and then some is acceptable and promoted) is not given a place on the “inclusivity” bandwagon. 

Following Ms Sturgeon’s involvement in Pride, a Scottish Government spokesman said: “Scotland is considered to be one of the most progressive countries in Europe regarding LGBTI equality, and Pride Glasgow is a fantastic event that brings communities together and celebrates all that LGBTI people contribute to Scottish life.

“As a society we must champion equality and fairness at all times and defend the progress that has been made.”
Ed Hmmmm. Doesn’t quite tie in with the city motto, does it:  “Let Glasgow flourish by the preaching of Thy word and the praising of Thy name.”

Click here to read Evening Times article, minus Catholic Truth editorial comment.

Una Voce: SSPX “Complicated” the Preservation of Old Mass in Scotland!

From Scottish Catholic Observer, January, 27th 2017…
TradMasswithsaintscolourThe traditional way to celebrate Mass is Extraordinary
DOROTHY CUMMINGS MCLEAN looks at how a new generation in Scotland is being attracted to the traditional rituals of the Latin Mass

While researching the diversity of Catholicism in Scotland, I was surprised by the overlap. Not everyone who goes regularly to Ukrainian Mass is Ukrainian. Syro-Malabar priests learn the Latin Rite to serve the Latin Rite majority. Catholic students are at home both in their university chaplaincies and in parishes. Polish-speakers are happy to go to Mass in English, and there are Scottish-Polish Catholic fellowship groups. Finally, there are those Latin Rite Catholics, of whatever nationality, who feel drawn to the Extraordinary Form of the Mass and practise Catholic devotions we now call ‘traditional.’

The history of the revival of the Traditional Latin Mass in Scotland begins in the heady days after the Second Vatican Council when dramatic changes swept through the Church’s liturgical and devotional practises.

In hindsight, the Missal of 1965 wasn’t revolutionary, but it sparked both the foundation of Latin Mass preservation societies and a spirit of liturgical experimentation. The Mass Paul VI promulgated in 1969 was so different from the Mass they knew that many Catholics felt deeply bereaved.

One such Catholic in Scotland was an influential convert named Mary Neilson (1912 – 2002). A member of a wealthy Presbyterian family in Edinburgh, she was (temporarily) disinherited by her parents when she converted to Catholicism in 1938.

Undaunted, she embarked on a career as a welfare officer, social worker and health researcher. In 1965, dubious of the changes proposed for the Latin Mass, she turned her considerable energies towards the preservation of the Old Rite. Not only did Miss Neilson help to establish the Scottish branch of the International Una Voce Federation, she offered her home in the West End as a centre of traditional worship.

The ‘Old Mass’ was said privately there by priests in good standing from 1970. When Miss Nielson died, she left the house to the Fraternity of the Priest of Saint Peter (FSSP), who maintain its chapel.

The preservation of the Traditional Mass has been complicated in Scotland by the presence of the Society of Saint Pius X (SSPX). The association of the ‘Old Mass’ with the SSPX, disobedience and schism has been hard on Catholics who practise the traditional devotions: to this day we suffer suspicious looks and sardonic remarks. [emphasis added – in disbelief!]

Fortunately, this prejudice has not been universal: in 2004, for example, Edinburgh’s Fr Michael Regan invited the FSSP to celebrate the Traditional Mass in St Andrew’s, Ravelston.

The promulgation of Summorum Pontificum in 2007 by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI was a golden moment for lovers of traditional devotions. This short document praises earlier forms of the Latin Rite, declares that the Missal of 1962 was never abrogated, describes its Mass as the ‘extraordinary’ form of the Latin Rite and gives generous provisions for its use. Pope Benedict’s enthusiasm for tradition brought a new generation into contact with the Extraordinary Form and its community.

Civil servant Mark Hamid, 28, first encountered the Extraordinary Form in Oxford in 2007. “It was a revelation,” he told me.

As a university student, he invited the FSSP to bring the Extraordinary Form from Edinburgh to St Andrews. The Mass was made available to students from 2011 until 2016, when attendance dropped off. This was in part because there were more activities for students on Sunday afternoons, but also because of the popularity of the Extraordinary Form (EF) Mass now celebrated in Dundee. Since then Hamid has organised the ‘Two Shrines Pilgrimage,’ a Scottish version of the Walsingham pilgrimage organised by England’s Latin Mass Society.

Glasgow physicist Gerald Bonner, 30, first witnessed the Extraordinary Form in 2011 at an Australian Catholic students’ conference in Sydney. Initially he found it confusing. “I probably attended about five EF Masses before really getting into the rhythm,” he admitted.

Asked what he gets from the EF, Mr Bonner was expansive. “The rich beauty of the prayers and the ritual in the EF reveal so clearly that the Mass is the re-presentation of the Sacrifice of Calvary,” he said. “The chants, the silences, the posture of the priest all serve to draw you into that mystery and make it easier to participate in it fully.

“While most of these things are possible in the Ordinary Form, they are more reliably found in the Extraordinary Form, which is less dependent on the style of the priest.”

The EF has also had a positive effect on Mr Bonner’s experience of the Ordinary Form which, due to time constraints, he attends more often: “Not only do I understand its roots better, I can participate more deeply having experienced the Old Rite.”

Ian and Kristiina Watt, 26, of Glasgow are professional musicians who became Catholics two years ago after approaching the FSSP priest in Edinburgh. “We were interested in the Traditional Mass before coming into the Church,” Ian said, “attracted by its beauty and historical continuity, two aspects of Catholicism which influenced both our conversions.”

Kristiina added: “As a musician, the beautiful Catholic legacy of art and music intended for the traditional Mass was often a source of inspiration and assurance for me during the period leading up to our [reception].”

“I don’t know if it is correct to speak of ‘Traditional Latin Mass (TLM) communities’ as such,” Ian said, “but the presence of the TLM seems to be a sign of overall health in a diocese or parish community.

“For example, the parish at which this Mass is offered most frequently in Glasgow, six times a week in addition to the daily parish Ordinary Form (OF) Mass, is notable for its provision of regular solid catechesis, scheduled Confessions before and after every Mass, weekly Vespers and Benediction, seasonal devotions and outreach to the homeless and vulnerable, all provided by just one parish priest with the help of volunteers.”

Immaculate Heart of Mary, Balornock, is an example of how traditional devotions can be fully integrated into a Scottish parish. In 2007, Summorum Pontificum inspired its pastor, Fr Morris, to say the Extraordinary Form twice a week.

These Masses attracted a ‘small but stable group of the faithful,’ reported the church organist Fraser Pearce. “Soon after this the parish gained the support of Una Voce and things grew from there.”

As no OF Masses were cancelled to make room for the EF, there was no protest. Today there are daily EF Masses (except on Mondays) at Immaculate Heart.

“We have lots of social events and outings in addition to catechetical talks on Sunday evenings, and people who attend either Mass share together in these,” Mr Pearce said. Immaculate Heart also runs its own food bank—’We have fed up to as many as 15 families a week’—and delivers donations of household goods.

The parishioners help the Sisters of Charity in their Glasgow soup kitchen and host three annual meals for homeless men. “We seek to imitate Our Lord in practising the corporal acts of mercy while keeping in mind that our primary mission is the salvation of souls,” Mr Pearce explained.

“These meals are usually preceded by a short service in which we pray for the souls of those men who have died since the previous occasion.”

In addition to Masses in both Forms, Vespers and Benediction, Immaculate Heart parish offers the Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament on Mondays and the Rosary and Confession on Friday evenings.

“We also have First Saturday Devotions as requested by Our Lady of Fatima,” Mr Pearce said. The parish even has a ceremony crowning the statue of Our Lady in May.

“Immaculate Heart runs a full programme of all the traditional devotions that were part of Catholic life until recent years,” Mr Pearce explained.

And who are the Catholics who flock to all this old-fashioned stuff?

“People of all ages, professionals, unemployed people and students from across the West of Scotland,” Mr Pearce said. “We have several young married couples and a good few converts who come into the Church looking for the fullness of the traditional Faith and found it here. We have people who travel from as far as Edinburgh and Ayr several times each week.

“In the last nine months we have gained many new parishioners as well as friends of the parish who are able to visit depending on circumstances… I don’t think that anyone is attached by nostalgia.”

I myself have gone to the FSSP Sunday Mass at St Andrew’s, Ravelston, since I moved to Scotland. I like to say that I ‘married into the Mass,’ since I never went to the EF before I married my convert husband. Having read a lot of classical Catholic theology, I soon felt at home in the traditional rite.

In no way has this cut me off of from the rest of the Church. Indeed, if I can’t make it to the noon Mass at St Andrew’s, I can usually be found at Polish Mass at St Mary’s Cathedral.

Comment: 

Today’s Scottish Catholic Observer was given to me after Mass in the SSPX chapel in Glasgow by a gentleman who was incensed by the nasty falsehoods about the SSPX.  I’ve now read the piece for myself and to say that it’s laughable for Una Voce to claim that the SSPX is, or was, ever, detrimental to the preservation of the ancient Mass, is like saying that Charlie Chaplin was comical.  Hilarious, more like. 

But for the SSPX there is no way in this world that Summorum Pontificum would ever have come to pass.  That’s a fact. Not an alternative fact, just a fact. And without that green light from Pope Benedict,  the supposedly “traditional leaning” clergy would have remained just that – “supposedly”. As it is, there are plenty who don’t offer the old Mass or make any attempt to learn it, because they know their bishop doesn’t approve. Career priests. It’s great that Fr Morris of Immaculate Heart did grasp the opportunity when it came along, but one swallow, as the old saying goes, doth not a summer make. The archdiocese is not advertising the Immaculate Heart Masses and we don’t need Sherlock Holmes on the case to work out why. 

I’m very pleased that the Immaculate Heart Masses are on offer. I do my best to attend them whenever I can, but I’ve explained to the organisers that where their parish Masses clash with a Mass on the same day in the SSPX chapel, if I’m free to attend Mass on that day I will be attending the (much less conveniently situated) Society chapel precisely for the reason given above – that, but for the Society suffering false allegations of “schism” and being sidelined for years now, they would not have their several Masses a week in Immaculate Heart.  

Further, while it’s better than nothing to have the TLM offered in a diocesan parish alongside the novus ordo, I’d be more pleased if the novus ordo were banished altogether, but, as we can see from the article, even those who are attending the old Mass in the Immaculate Heart are quite happy to attend the novus ordo as well. 

That’s why we still need the SSPX – that’s why we needed them in the beginning to preserve the TLM until Summorum Pontificum came long and the bandwagon started to fill up. Because, like it or lump it, it’s only in the SSPX chapels that we can rely on hearing, seeing and experiencing undiluted Catholic doctrine and liturgy.  It’s the only place where you will never hear anyone insult the ancient Mass by referring to it using the Modernist label “Extraordinary Form” .  NEVER.   Want to convince us otherwise? Let’s go…