1st May: Feast of St Joseph the Worker – in this, the beautiful Month of Mary…

And to mark the beginning of the Month of Mary – a beautiful rendering of “Ave Maria”…

Comment: 

This is a two-fold celebration.  So feel free to post your favourite prayers and hymns to both Our Lady at the beginning of her special Month of Mary, and St Joseph on his Feast under his title of “The Worker”  – as well as any edifying stories you’ve heard / read, or experiences/miracles of your own which you attribute to Our Lady and/or St Joseph’s intercession.  If you have any special intentions that you wish bloggers to remember in prayer during Our Lady’s month, or on this great Feast of St Joseph, feel free to let us know. We give great glory to God when we pay tribute to His saints, and especially His Mother and St Joseph.

Happy Feast of St Joseph the Worker, and a lovely Month of Mary to one and all!  

April, 2019: Happy St George’s Day!

With sincere apologies to our English bloggers and readers – I completely forgot to post a thread to mark the Feast of St George on 23 April – and since we’ve posted Feast Day threads for St Andrew, St Patrick and St David, I decided to copy last year’s St George’s thread… and hope nobody noticed 😀

Comment:

Hopefully, all Catholic Truth readers, bloggers and visitors to this site remembered to offer a prayer for the hierarchy of England on the Feast of the national Patron Saint, imploring all the graces necessary for them to begin the work of restoring the traditional Catholic Faith in their land, which bears the beautiful title of “Dowry of Mary”.

Belated Feast Day greetings to one and all! 

St George of England, pray for us!   

19/3: Feast of St Joseph, Patron of the Universal Church & of a Happy Death

The music video below is an instrumental only – the words to the hymn are posted for the benefit of those of us who love to sing this beautiful hymn in honour of the great Saint Joseph – but note, to sing the entire hymn, you’ll need to re-play the video half-way through…

Dear St. Joseph, pure and gentle,
Guardian of our Saviour child,
Treading with the virgin Mother
Egypts deserts rough and wild,

CHORUS
Hail St Joseph, spouse of Mary,
Blessed above all saints on high,
When the death-shades round us gather,
Teach, O teach us how to die (twice)

He who rested on Thy bosom,
Is by countless saints adored,
Prostrate angels in His presence,
Sing Hosannas to the Lord.

CHORUS
Hail St Joseph, spouse of Mary,
Blessed above all saints on high,
When the death-shades round us gather,
Teach, O teach us how to die (twice)

Now to thee no gift refusing,
Jesus stoops to hear thy prayer,
Then, dear saint from thy fair dwelling
Give to us a father’s care.

CHORUS
Hail St Joseph, spouse of Mary,
Blessed above all saints on high,
When the death-shades round us gather,
Teach, O teach us how to die (twice)

Dear St. Joseph, kind and loving,
stretch to us a helping hand,
Guide us through earth’s toils and sorrows,
Safely to the distant land.

CHORUS
Hail St Joseph, spouse of Mary,
Blessed above all saints on high,
When the death-shades round us gather,
Teach, O teach us how to die (twice)

Comment: 

We really ought to pray very hard today, to seek St Joseph’s powerful intercession as Patron of the Universal Church at this time of unprecedented and worsening scandal, adversely affecting the Faith of many Catholics, preventing those who are poorly instructed as well as those outside the Church from seeing her beauty and realising her God-given mission as unique custodian and preacher of religious truth and guardian of the moral order. St Joseph, Patron of the Universal Church, pray for us! 

As with all devotional threads, post your favourite stories about St Joseph, prayers, novenas, miracles, hymns.  

The story goes that a visiting Bishop brought some strictly enclosed nuns a large tub of ice-cream to share.  When the Mother Prioress protested that it was Lent, the Bishop replied: “Well, we need these wee breaks in Lent!”  I think that is even more true today, so – Catholic Truth bloggers and readers – enjoy some ice-cream to mark the Feast of St Joseph, as we celebrate this wee break in Lent!  

A very happy Feast of St Joseph to all our bloggers and visitors to this site. 

Without good books and spiritual reading, it will be morally impossible to save our souls. (St. Alphonsus Liguori)

 

For purchasing details, click on image…

But what sort of “good books” and “spiritual reading” will help us to save our souls?

 

I’ve heard young Catholics raving about Lord of the Rings as a great story and a marvellous means of understanding their Faith better. Here’s author J.R.R. Tolkien: “The Lord of the Rings is of course a fundamentally religious and Catholic work; unconsciously so at first, but consciously in the revision.” [1] By design The Lord of the Rings is not a Christian allegory but rather an invented myth [2] about Christian and Catholic truths. As one commentator noted, giving a young person Lord of the Rings as a means of communicating essential truths of the Faith is to use the same method a mother uses to feed spinach to her baby – sneaking it in via the rivetting story!

If you can think of other non-fiction works to recommend – not just for the young but for us all, as wholesome as possible – let’s hear it…  

Without good books and spiritual reading, it will be morally impossible to save our souls. (St. Alphonsus Liguori)


There is an abundance of solid spiritual reading available;  given the state of the Church right now, however, it is wise to avoid contemporary writings and stick with the tried and tested classics written by great saints,  such as  The Sermons of St Alphonsus…  

for purchasing details, click on image…

For purchasing details click on image…

 

The Secret of the Rosary by St Louis De Montfort is another classic, which I’m currently re-reading – it never fails to inspire and edify – highly recommended, although I have to admit that not everyone finds it an easy read in the beginning – but  it’s worth persevering. I’ve heard it described as “transformative” – with good reason.  You can read it online by clicking on the  link above, at the name of the book.

 

 

For details of how to purchase a copy, click on image…

Another book which has transformed the spiritual lives of Catholics since its publication is St Thérèse of Lisieux’s Story of a Soul which, again, you can read online here

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Life of Christ by Fulton Sheen is another beautiful read; to quote the blurb on the back page of the complete and unabridged copy which describes the contents faithfully:  “With his customary insight and reverence, the author interprets the scripture and describes Christ not only in historical perspective but in exciting and contemporary terms;  he sees in Christ’s life modern parallels and timeless lessons. Sheen probes the hearts of many prominent New Testament figures – Joseph and Mary, Peter and the disciples, Herod, Pilate, et al – shedding new light on age-old events.  The whole adds up to a masterful study: a faithful blending of philosophy, history, and biblical exegesis.” 

For details of how to purchase a copy, click on image…  

 

 

Share your favourite spiritual reading with us in the comments below – not least reading that will inspire us to persevere during Lent… Now, there’s a challenge, folks!

 

17/3 St Patrick’s Day: Pray for Ireland

 

Comment: 

As always with devotional threads, feel free to post your favourite hymns, prayers, stories and jokes of the “good clean fun” variety.  Above all, however, please pray for Ireland today; the Faith has gone, and the state of both Irish politics and the Irish hierarchy appear to be in terminal decline.  So much so, that I feel the need to add the hymn to Our Lady of Knock, as we all, I hope, seek her intercession in prayer for that once great Catholic country, now among the (if not THE) most secular of all the nations in Europe.

 

A very happy St Patrick’s day to one and all! 

1st March: Feast of St David of Wales…

According to tradition, St. David was the son of King Sant of South Wales and St. Non.

He was ordained a priest and later studied under St. Paulinus. Later, he was involved in missionary work and founded a number of monasteries. The monastery he founded at Menevia in Southwestern Wales was noted for extreme asceticism.

David and his monks drank neither wine nor beer – only water – while putting in a full day of heavy manual labor and intense study.

Around the year 550, David attended a synod at Brevi in Cardiganshire. His contributions at the synod are said to have been the major cause for his election as primate of the Cambrian Church.

He was reportedly consecrated archbishop by the patriarch of Jerusalem while on a visit to the Holy Land. He also is said to have invoked a council that ended the last vestiges of Pelagianism.  

David died at his monastery in Menevia around the year 589, and his cult was approved in 1120 by Pope Callistus II. He is revered as the patron of Wales.

Undoubtedly, St. David was endowed with substantial qualities of spiritual leadership. What is more, many monasteries flourished as a result of his leadership and good example. His staunch adherence to monastic piety bespeaks a fine example for modern Christians seeking order and form in their prayer life.His feast day is March 1.  Source – Catholic Online

Comment: 

I’m ashamed to say that, while, over the years, we have marked the Feast days of St George of England, St Patrick of Ireland and St Andrew of Scotland, we’ve never discussed the patron saint of Wales, St David.  I’m not sure if we have any online readers from Wales but, anyway, we ought to wish our brothers and sisters in Wales a very happy Feast of St David. Usual Feast day thread rules apply – post your favourite hymns, prayers, stories, and any good clean jokes that fit the occasion.  Here’s one to kick start the celebration…

 

14 January: Feast of St Mungo (Kentigern) Patron Saint of Glasgow… 

Mungo or Kentigern was born in 518. He was the son of Tannoch, a princess of Lothian, who has given her name to St Enoch’s Square in Glasgow, and to Tannochside near Uddingston. Tannoch’s father was a pagan and when she adopted Christianity she was expelled from her home. During her wanderings she was raped, and her father ordered that she be set adrift in an open boat at Aberlady in order that her pregnancy should not bring a slur on the family name. The boat was washed upon the shore at the Christian settlement of Culross and there the infant Kentigern was born. He was christened Kendyern, British for “Great Chief’. (The British form indicates that the ‘g’ should be soft. The hard ‘g’ perhaps arises from the fact that Jocelyn wrote in Latin).

But within the community he was often referred to by the pet name of Myncho, which has become Mungo, and means “little dear”. It is by this name that he is known as the patron saint of Glasgow. Having been ordained priest, Kentigern set out to restore the faith at Glasgow. He crossed the Forth at Alloa and set up his church on the Molendinar Burn, where Glasgow Cathedral now stands at the top of the High Street. He was greatly aided in his work of conversion by the local chieftain Rederich, whose fortress was Dumbarton, the fort of the Britons. Rederich brought over a Bishop from Ireland to consecrate the 25-year-old Kentigern first bishop of Glasgow.

Trouble from the pagans led to the flight of Rederich and Kentigern to the South. They stopped for a short time near Penrith and established a settlement at Crossfield. After a brief sojourn there, Kentigern travelled to Wales where he founded a monastery in the Vale of Ciwyd. Meanwhile Rederich and allies had defeated the pagans near Carlisle and Kentigern was able to return to Scotland in 573. He stopped at Hoddam, by Dumfries, and established missions throughout Galloway, which had been converted 150 years earlier by St Ninian.

After eight years Kentigern returned to Glasgow, where he died in January 603. In 1197, probably as a result of Jocelyn’s writings, a church was built over the tomb, and his church was the beginnings of the present Glasgow Cathedral. In Glasgow he was known better by his pet name of Mungo, but dedications to St Kentigern are common throughout the South of Scotland, in the North of England, and in Wales. Jocelyn’s account informs us that Kentigern met many other saints -St Serf at Culross, Saints David and Asaph in Wales, St Columba in Glasgow.

He also paid several visits to Rome, on the last of which the Pope gave Glasgow the title “Special Daughter of the Church”. St Kentigern was chosen as our patron firstly because of his connection with the old Kingdom of Lothian, his grandfather being Loth who ruled from the fort on Traprain Law near Haddington; and secondly because so many of the pupils here have Glasgow origins. 

The meaning of Glasgow’s coat of arms (pictured above)

Here is the bird that never flew
Here is the tree that never grew
Here is the bell that never rang
Here is the fish that never swam

The Glasgow coat of arms relate to the life and legend of St Mungo. The arms include ‘the tree that never grew’ relating to St Mungo tending a fire in St Serf’s monastery but he fell asleep and some lads who were envious of Mungo’s favoured position with St Serf put out the fire while he slept. When Mungo woke he broke off branches from a frozen hazel tree and by praying over them and lit the fire again, the hazel branches were transformed in to a fully grown tree. The ‘bird that never flew’ is about a robin that had been tamed by St Serf and it had been accidently killed. Mungo prayed over the robin and brought it back to life. The ‘fish that never swam’ is about a ring which a King gave to his wife Langoureth who gave it to her lover a knight who wore it and when the King noticed this took it from him when he was sleeping and threw it in the River Clyde. The King then demanded to see the ring from Langeoreth and she confessed this to Mungo who sent a monk to fish the river and found the lost ring. The bell is attributed to a bell that was reputedly given to Mungo by the Pope.  The motto “Let Glasgow Flourish” is an abbreviation of a statement taken from a sermon given by the saint: “Let Glasgow flourish by the preaching of Thy Word and the praising of Thy Name.” 

St Enoch

Mungo’s mother Thenew is  also known as St Enoch. It is believed St Enoch’s Square in Glasgow City Centre is the site of her burial ground.

For your interest…

For your information…

There is Mass in the SSPX church of St Andrew, Renfrew Street, Glasgow, at 6.30pm on Monday, 14 January, to mark the Feast. 

Happy Feast Day everyone!  

Comments invited…