23/4 – Feast of St George of England!

 

Comment:

How will you be celebrating St George’s Day?  Hopefully, all Catholic Truth readers, bloggers and visitors to this site will remember a prayer for the hierarchy of England on this Feast, imploring all the graces necessary for them to begin the work of restoring the traditional Catholic Faith in their land, which bears the beautiful title of “Dowry of Mary”

Pope Francis’ Exhortation on Holiness Pushes Ecumenical Holy Spirit…

Holiness is the most attractive face of the Church. But even outside the Catholic Church and in very different contexts, the Holy Spirit raises up “signs of his presence which help Christ’s followers”.[7] Saint John Paul II reminded us that “the witness to Christ borne even to the shedding of blood has become a common inheritance of Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans and Protestants”.[8] In the moving ecumenical commemoration held in the Colosseum during the Great Jubilee of the Year 2000, he stated that the martyrs are “a heritage which speaks more powerfully than all the causes of division”. (#9) Source

 

Comment:

Pope Francis persists in giving the impression that salvation is a “done deal” , as long as people are kind and caring to the less fortunate.  While it is true that souls may be saved who are not within the visible bounds of the Catholic Church, it is not true to claim that they are thus saved in their false (or no) religion.  Souls are saved ONLY through Christ’s Passion and Death, through the operations of grace within His Church.  Why won’t the Pope say this?  Why give the impression that the Holy Spirit is “ecumenical”? 

And there’s plenty more to shock in this encyclical – so feel free to identify the part(s) that had you choking on your post-Easter chocolate…

Catholic Truth Goes To Rome!

Blogger, Petrus, writes…

Last week I was fortunate to spend four days in the Eternal City. Having been to Rome four times previously, I was keen to ensure that I visited some of the lesser well-known churches that I hadn’t visited before.

Being a Dominican Tertiary, too, on my list were the two main Dominican basilicas in Rome – Santa Sabina, the mother church of the Order where an 800 year old orange tree, planted by St Dominic himself, can still be seen and still bears fruit, and Santa Maria sopra Minerva, the burial place of the great Dominican Tertiary, St Catherine of Siena.

St Catherine of Siena, who corrected the pope by letter and the spoken word, is a worthy patroness for anyone who speaks out and defends the Faith. The great saint exhorts us to, “Proclaim the Truth and do not be silent through fear.” Therefore, it was my privilege to kneel before her sepulchre, contained within the High Altar in Santa Maria sopra Minerva, and consecrate the Catholic Truth apostolate to St Catherine of Siena.

Comment:

The  early editions  of our newsletter featured the following comment from St Catherine of Siena on the front page, so thank you for remembering us, and for dedicating our humble apostolate  at her sepulchre in Rome – that’s beautiful, and greatly appreciated! 

Tell us how you voted in the poll, and why, for our education and edification.  

 

19/3: Happy Feast of Saint Joseph… 

Dear St Joseph, pure and gentle,
guardian of the Saviour child,
Treading, with the virgin mother,
Egypt’s deserts rough and wild.
Dear St Joseph, spouse of Mary,
blest above all saints on high,
When the death shades round us gather,
teach, O teach us how to die,
teach, O teach us how to die.

He who rested on thy bosom
is by countless saints adored,
Prostrate angels in his presence
sing hosannahs to their Lord.
Dear St Joseph, spouse of Mary,
blest above all saints on high,
When the death shades round us gather,
teach, O teach us how to die,
teach, O teach us how to die.

Now to thee, no gift refusing,
Jesus stoops to hear thy prayer;
Then, dear saint, from thy fair dwelling,
give to us a father’s care.
Dear St Joseph, spouse of Mary,
blest above all saints on high,
When the death shades round us gather,
teach, O teach us how to die,
teach, O teach us how to die.

Dear St Joseph, kind and loving,
stretch to us a helping hand;
guide us through life’s toils and sorrows
safely to the distant land.
Dear St Joseph, spouse of Mary,
blest above all saints on high,
When the death shades round us gather,
teach, O teach us how to die,
teach, O teach us how to die.

Comment:


St Joseph 
is a very powerful saint indeed, so if you’ve experienced his powerful intercession, share your story with us, here.
Publish, too, your favourite prayers and hymns to this great saint.
Happy Feast of St Joseph, everyone!

17/03/18: Hail, Glorious Saint Patrick!

I cannot allow the Feast of my patron saint to pass without marking it, so I wish everyone, bloggers and readers, A very happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

As always with devotional threads, feel free to post relevant comments, stories and jokes, favourite prayers and hymns… As well as the above rendition of the hymn to Saint Patrick, I’m posting the lovely Irish hymn to Our Lady of Knock… Enjoy!

Is There A RIGHT Reason For Young Catholics To Leave The Church?

From the Scottish Catholic Observer, 2nd March…

Young people are ‘leaving the Church in droves,’ says Scots delegate to Vatican youth synod  By James Farrell

Young people are ‘leaving the Church in droves for all the wrong reasons,’ according to Scotland’s representative to a global Vatican meeting of young people.
Sean Deighan, 23, a youth worker for Glasgow Archdiocese, will be one of 300 young representatives to attend the Synod on Young People, the Faith, and Vocational Discernment to be held in Rome from March 19 to 24.

The meeting is being held ahead of a Synod of Bishops in October that will focus on youth.

“I didn’t realise it was such a select group [attending the meeting] and it’s a great privilege,” Mr Deighan said. “I hope that my voice will be heard and by extension I hope the representative voice of all young people in Scotland will be heard. I’m optimistic that real results will materialise from the pre-synodal meeting. I think what needs to be addressed is that young people are leaving the Church in droves for all the wrong reasons.

“They are leaving the Church because of what they think the Church is and not the reality. If we want to pursue the new evangelisation authentically then we need to present the Church ­authentically and young people need to see that.”
“When young people see the Church being presented authentically, it’s attractive,” Mr Deighan said. “We have never had to dress things up or use false pretences to get people in the Church. It has always been the reality of the Church’s message which they are attracted to.”

At the Angelus on Sunday February 18, Pope Francis called on young people from around the world to take part in the preparatory work of the upcoming synod.
“I strongly desire that all young people might be the protagonists of this preparation,” Pope Francis said. “And so they will be able to contribute online through linguistic groups moderated by other young people.”

The Pope was referring to an initiative promoted by the Secretariat of the Synod of Bishops, under the direction of its general secretary, Cardinal Lorenzo Baldiserri. Young people have been invited to join a Facebook group through the Synod website, http://www.synod2018.va, and from March 12 will have the ­opportunity to send questions to Pope Francis for the Synod on the group page.

“Pope Francis insisted on showing great concern for the ‘distant’—the young people of the ‘peripheries,’ those who are not part of our network of Catholics faithful,” Cardinal Baldisseri said in conversation with the Vatican website.

“The participants will be able to ask questions, propose ideas and therefore act as intermediaries between the ecclesial institution that derives from the people of God and secular society. The experience that will be proposed to them will consist in getting to know the Church better, discovering what we are more deeply.”

At the end of the youth meeting representatives will approve a document, the result of the work of the entire week, which will express their point of view on the reality of youth in the Church and present their expectations, their doubts and their hopes. This document will then help guide reflections at the synod in October.  Source – SCO

Comment: 

I know it’s been a while, but when I was a schoolgirl we were taught about the Faith, that we were Catholics and should be knowledgeable and be able to explain it to those we met outside of school, friends etc. and later, in the workplace, colleagues.  There was no mention of, let alone emphasis on, the fact that we were “young Catholics”, a separate type of Catholic from everyone else.  We didn’t have “special” Masses for the young, etc. That’s the beauty of the Traditional Latin Mass, with which I grew up – it cannot be manipulated into a performance tailored to particular groups. We were simply Catholics. This contemporary emphasis on reaching out to the young as if they ARE a different type of Catholic has led to a great deal of muddled thinking, beginning with this…

Those young people identified in the above SCO report, are not leaving the Church because they are young. They are leaving it – as the author writes – for all the wrong reasons, and that is because, there IS no “right reason” to leave Christ and His Church.  Someone needs to clarify for those youngsters who say they believe in Jesus, admire Jesus etc. but just don’t like the Church or “institutionalised religion” that, like love and marriage, as the old song goes, you can’t have one without the other.  Christ cannot be separated from His Church – that’s the way HE has arranged things. 

Think of your favourite quotes from Scripture and from saints, to drive home this message to the young.  Plenty read this blog, I’m told, so how would YOU convince them that, not only is there no right reason to leave Christ’s Church, but there is no “wrong” reason either – leaving the Church for any reason means  that they are risking damnation  – spelt out, they are risking suffering Hell fire for all eternity.  Not cool.  Convince them to begin their journey to the fullness of the Faith which they have manifestly not been taught and which, if they truly knew it, would love it and never dream of leaving it.  What’s the first thing you would advise a young person seeking the Faith in its fullness to do… where’s the best place to begin that journey?

    

Scripture: Be Angry And… Go To Hell!

St. Paul mentions outbursts of anger along with sev­eral other sins, including fornication, jealousy, enmity, and strife. He concludes with this warning: “I warn you as I warned you before, that those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God” (Gal. 5:20–21). What could be further from Christ’s command in the Sermon on the Mount, to “love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you” (Matt. 5:43)? He said, “I say to you that every one who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment; whoever insults his brother shall be liable to the council, and whoever says, ‘You fool!’ shall be liable to the fire of hell” (Matt. 5:22)…

We have all encountered people who explode when they feel angry. It baffles me how often this sort of anger rears its ugly head in marriages — even in allegedly Christian marriages. The damage done by this behavior is huge. A raging father or mother or child is torture for just about everyone in the family, including the angry one. This is an­other behavior that’s incompatible with being a Christian.

I am often surprised to discover Christians who pray ardently, who receive the sacraments regularly, who even attend Mass daily, and yet have an anger problem. “If any one thinks he is religious, and does not bridle his tongue but deceives his heart, this man’s religion is vain” (James 1:26).

Some even say, “Well, if you’re [of ethnicity X], you’re going to get angry a lot.” Not so! Rather, if you’re a Chris­tian, you will work very hard to find a way to cut back on your anger dramatically. For the real Christian, it’s not where we’re from that counts the most, but where we would like to go one day. Explosive anger is not something you want to have with you when you leave this planet. It will profoundly dampen your ability to enter the Kingdom.

If you have a problem with exploding anger and you want to be a Christian, you absolutely must work hard to overcome it. You cannot simply say, “Well, that’s me,” if you want to be friends with the Lord. Granted, perhaps most angry outbursts are not mortal sins because sufficient reflection is absent. But choosing not to strive ardently to overcome hateful outbursts is usually done with full knowl­edge and deliberate consent of the will and so could well be a mortal sin. As with many serious sins, if we are really trying to overcome them, we can be close to God. If we are not trying, we can’t.  [Taken Father T.G. Morrow:   Recognising Sinful Anger ]

Comment: 

In recent days, I’ve been in conversation with a variety of friends (and enemies!) about anger; when it is useful, when it is good or not-so-good, when it is, or might be, sinful, and since Pope Francis hasn’t been on a plane recently (that I’ve heard about), and thus we have a gap in the “Francis Latest” Department, I thought it might prove to be an interesting topic for discussion. The topic isn’t simply about being angry, though  – that’s too easy – but about holding on to anger, even allowing it to turn to bitterness.  Is there a cure?  Help!