Video Confirms BBC Scotland Bigotry – But Bishop Keenan Misses The Point…

From the  Catholic Herald – BBC Scotland video says Holy Communion ‘smells like hate’
Bishop John Keenan of Paisley criticised the video for encouraging anti-Catholic prejudice

The Bishop of Paisley has criticised BBC Scotland after a video said Holy Communion “tastes like cardboard and smells like hate”.

The video was posted on the Facebook page of BBC The Social, a project aimed at young adults and managed by BBC Scotland, under the title “This is how homophobia feels in 2018”.    

Holy Communion
“tastes like cardboard and smells like hate” – blasphemy, BBC Scotland video…

At one point it depicts a priest holding a Mini Cheddar in a parody of the Host, and giving it to a woman who makes the sign of the cross. The narrator says Jesus “saved a lot of time when he died for our crimes, that he would’ve wasted teaching small minds that love is no sin”.

He then looks at a street preacher, saying: “See him, he thinks it’s faith.” The video then cuts back to the women who received Communion and continues: “But under all that din, it tastes like cardboard and smells like hate”.

Bishop John Keenan of Paisley told the Catholic Herald that the video was “offensive to Catholics in both the words and images used”.

He said that while there is always room for debate, the video is “not fair comment”. “It is ridiculing and demeaning the faith of ordinary Catholics,” he said, “especially at a time when Catholics are experiencing more and more abuse and prejudice in Scotland.”

“The BBC has to be careful,” he added. “It has to ask itself if it has ceased to be a broadcaster in the public interest, and is just promoting particular interests.

“You cannot imagine it treating any other religion like this.”

The Archdiocese of St Andrew’s and Edinburgh also criticised the video’s suggestion that orthodox Christianity, including Catholicism, encourages public hatred of gay people.

“The Catechism of the Catholic Church, states that: ‘They [homosexual persons] must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided’,” the archdiocese said.

Last month, a report for the Scottish government found that Catholics are the victims of 57 per cent of all religiously aggravated hate crimes reported in the country. Elaine Smith, a Labour member of the Scottish Parliament, noted that this is also an increasing trend.

She called on the SNP government to “go out to the Catholic population and listen to their concerns”. She quoted Archbishop Philip Tartaglia of Glasgow, who said: “Our problem is not so much sectarianism but anti-Catholicism.”   Source 

Catholic Truth Editorial Comment:

The video under discussion is filthy claptrap. It is, by definition, an assault on normality – which homosexual activity, is not. Normal, I mean.  Two people of the same sex engaging in pseudo-sexual activity is now commonplace, but it will never EVER be normal.  Click here to read more.

Yet, instead of objecting to the assumption that sodomy (now renamed “homosexuality” or “being gay” because, well,  who would vote to legalise sodomy?)  is normal and acceptable, we get Bishop Keenan in “gentle disapproval” mode – not of homosexual activity, Heaven forfend, but (of course, rightly disapproving) of the insulting, blasphemous images and words about a central tenet of Catholicism, the Real Presence of Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament.  It’s right, of course, to object to that disgraceful attack on Our Lord, and our holy religion, but he should not have missed the opportunity to challenge the homosexual stranglehold on free speech.  They can say what they like, as insultingly as they like, but the rest of us, not so much…

The LGBT etc Brigade have been hugely successful in shutting down any questioning of their pseudo-sexual activity.  But,  before I’m charged with a “hate-crime” let me be absolutely crystal clear: I do not hate anyone, not bank robbers, not burglars, not mass murderers, not homosexuals, nobody.  I merely disagree profoundly with what they do and I will never EVER allow myself to be blackmailed into silent complicity by the threat of being labelled “homophobic” .  If disapproving of unnatural pseudo-sexual activity is “homophobic” (lit. fear of men!) then, call me “homophobic” – and proud of it. 

Bishop Keenan of Paisley, and the Archbishop (Philip Tartaglia) of Glasgow, both quoted in the Catholic Herald report, should have said the above, instead of leaving it to a small group of Catholic lay people to speak out against the moral evils of our day.  My message to them: stop mincing your words, if you will excuse the pun. 

Yes, this video is an evil attack on our Faith, manifestly anti-Catholic, yes it is encouraging the anti-Catholic prejudice which is a matter of public record in Scotland today, but, just as important is the fact that this video  promotes the lie that we are all bound to accept, without question, the New Morality in Scotland, no matter that our Catholic consciences dictate otherwise.  That needs to be called out for the tyranny that it is, using words of one syllable.  Quoting the Catechism on the need to respect people with same-sex attraction doesn’t quite cut it. They don’t want “respect”; they want acceptance.  They want the Church to condone their behaviour. Won’t happen. Bishops need to spell that out at every opportunity.  Otherwise, we can expect more of the same, and this video, believe me, is not something of which we want to see more…

Now, click here if you choose to watch the actual video which is disgraceful in the extreme.  It ends with a disgusting (let me repeat, disgusting) homosexual kiss. Urghhh!  Pray a Hail Mary for the grace to be unaffected by the film, for your purity to be protected.

For the record, whether they like it or not, BBC Scotland is about to receive the link to this thread.  So, share your thoughts  – politely, and in the Catholic spirit of our House Rules – about whether or not such a  video, featuring any other religion, would have seen the light of publication at the BBC. Rhetorical question, of course, but answer it anyway, in the comments below…

Cardinal Keith Patrick O’Brien RIP

Cardinal Keith Patrick O’Brien

From Scottish Catholic Media Office – press release…

His Eminence Archbishop Vincent Cardinal Nichols of Westminster used his homily during the Requiem Mass for the Cardinal Keith Patrick O’Brien RIP (1938-2018) to urge those present to pray for the repose of his soul and also for those he offended during his life…

The Requiem Mass was held at 1pm at St Michael’s Church in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, just yards from the home for the elderly where Cardinal O’Brien resided until recently. The 80-year-old cleric died on 19 March at the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle. The subsequent funeral arrangements were drawn up between the executor of his will, the O’Brien family and the Holy See as represented by Cardinal Nichols. Cardinal O’Brien will be buried at Mount Vernon Cemetery, Edinburgh, on Friday 6 April where he will be laid to rest with his mother and father. Cardinal Nichol’s homily is reproduced in full below:

Homily of Cardinal Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster
(Catholic Truth Editorial comment in bold)

There is a truth, deep in our Catholic tradition, often forgotten in our days, yet very relevant to this moment. It is this: that every funeral Mass is above all else a prayer for God’s mercy for the one who has died.  So often services after a death are seen to be a time for celebrating a life, for recognising the great achievements of a life now ended and for treasuring happy memories. Yet the emphasis of our tradition is somewhat different. Always, we gather to ask God’s mercy for the one who has died, today for Cardinal Keith O’Brien. We do so with trust and love, knowing that God’s promise of mercy is enduring and that our prayers, entering into the presence of the Father through, with and in Jesus, the beloved Son, will be heard.
[Ed: well, that’s a first. First in the long time that that, elementary Catholicism, has been said at any funeral, to best of my knowledge, since the onset of the modernist take-over of the Church. Alleluia! Difficult to explain, really, though, because we’ve “celebrated the life” of those who have committed suicide, who have cohabited, lived in same-sex partnerships – interesting that the life of Cardinal O’Brien has been singled out as one requiring the ancient tradition of praying for the salvation of the soul. Very interesting. A cynic might wonder about this.]

In recent days, the life of Cardinal Keith has been laid bare. We all know its lights and its darkness; we need not spend time talking about them even more for he has given us the key words. In his last will and testament he wrote: ‘I ask forgiveness of all I have offended in this life. I thank God for the many graces and blessings he has given me especially the Sacrament of Holy Orders.’ Today, as we prayer for the repose of his soul, we also pray for all those he offended and ask God to strengthen them at this time.

Cardinal Vincent Nichols

In seeking the mercy of God, Cardinal Keith follows in the footsteps laid out for us in our faith. St Patrick, whose name Keith Patrick O’Brien was proud to bear, wrote in his Confessions these words:

‘It is with fear and trembling that I should be awaiting the verdict that’s coming to me on that (judgement) day, when none of us can go absent or run for cover; and when every last one of us will have to answer for even our smallest sins at the court of Christ the Lord.’ (8) This is, indeed, the pathway we all have to trace.
Pondering on the mercy of God is what we should do today. You will recall the Year of Mercy. During it, Pope Francis encouraged us to ‘rediscover the infinite mercy of the Father who welcomes everyone and goes out personally to encounter each of them.’ The Pope also explained to us that ‘Jesus Christ is the face of the Father’s mercy’, adding, ‘Jesus of Nazareth, by his words, his actions, and his entire person reveals the mercy of God.’

Now this is what we have heard in this morning’s Gospel passage taken from St Luke. The two disciples are making their sad journey away from Jerusalem, a name that [is] used to represent the Church, the presence of God among His people. The two disciples, then, are walking away from the Church, disappointed in all their hopes, disillusioned by what they have seen and heard. But, see what the Risen Jesus does: he goes to walk with them, continuing their journey in the direction that they are going, away from Jerusalem. He does [not] simply tell them to turn back. No, he walks with them. He accompanies them. He listens fully to their dismay and their sense of being let down. Only gradually does he invite them to see beyond that dismay and begin to speak to their hearts. Even when he sits at table, he does not tell them to return to Jerusalem. He simply shows himself to them. The decision to return is one that they make, moved by the compassion they have found in him.
[Ed: this is a misinterpretation of the Gospel, whether mischevious or not one can only guess, to fit the new “theology of accompaniment”, but even a cursory examination of the passage shows that it doesn’t work, Cardinal Nichols, take note. For one thing, the two disciples were NOT “walking away from the Church” because they were guilty of no public sin – they were merely pondering the events surrounding the Passion and Death of Christ, downcast, at his death. It is preposterous to suggest that Christ would walk in the same direction – i.e.  actively tolerate sin – without “telling them to turn back from sin”. Indeed, as they recounted the story of the events in Jerusalem, Christ rebuked the pair:  “Oh, how foolish you are! How slow of heart to believe all that the prophets spoke!”   You left that bit out, Cardinal Nichols!
The tortuous attempt by Cardinal Nichols to link this Gospel account with the heresy in Amoris Laetitia  is underlined by the claim that “Even when he sits at table, he does not tell them to return to Jerusalem. He simply shows himself to them.” The implication is clear: Holy Communion for public sinners, adulterers et al, no problem. That’s what Our Lord did/would do.  Outrageous. And this is supposed to help the deceased Cardinal O’Brien … how?  Leaving his family and friends thinking that, well, he’s met with the God of Mercy, so let’s not worry about satisfying God’s justice?] 

In this account, we see the mercy of God at work, in the person of Jesus, coming to us in our dismay, in the prison of sin which we construct around ourselves, and opening for us to door through which we can retrace our steps back to him.
[Ed: well, as already said, there is no “sin” in this passage, just human disappointment.]

In the life of Cardinal O’Brien, as well as his failings, there was goodness, courage and many acts of simple kindness. Not least was his determination to serve the poor of the world. But when we come to stand before God we do so best when we come empty-handed. No matter how great or slight our achievements might be, we cannot depend on them. No, we come before God empty-handed so that we can receive the one thing necessary: a full measure of Gods’ mercy.

Only in this way can we hope to enter into the promise that was proclaimed in the first Reading of the Mass. ‘On this mountain the Lord of hosts will make for all people a feast of rich food! A feast of well-aged wines, strained clear.’ This is an image we can all understand and one for which we long, notwithstanding our unworthiness.

But then we are consoled with the next words: ‘Then the Lord God will wipe away the tears from all faces and the disgrace of his people.’ This too is the promise of the Lord. The healing of the wounds we have inflicted and the wounds we ourselves bear, is his work. It is a work that cannot be accomplished without Him. Yet as His work, it is a task in which we are to be his active servants and never simply sit on our hands. The promise of the heavenly banquet is for all; the task of healing and finding forgiveness is also for all.
[Ed: The heavenly banquet for most of us will, more likely than not, follow a period in Purgatory.  Why not mention that?  There’s no better time to drive home the four last things, Death, Judgment, Heaven & Hell, those key truths of the Faith, than at a funeral, any funeral. A reminder that Purgatory is evidence of God’s great mercy, gives hope to the faithful and to family members of the deceased, not least in a case such as that of the much publicised disgrace of Cardinal O’Brien. ]

I started with words from the Confession of St Patrick. So let me end with some more. Here is St Patrick’s faith, loud and clear. Let us make it ours today. He wrote:

‘I haven’t a doubt in the world that, on the day appointed, we shall rise up again in the brightness of the sun; that is to say in the glory of Jesus Christ Our Redeemer…since it is from him and through him and in him that we are going to reign. But the sun he bids to rise, morning by morning, for our benefit, will never reign, nor will its glory last. Christ is the true sun whose glory shall not fade. We who believe in him, and worship him – in fact anyone who does his will – shall live forever, because Christ lives forever, reigning with God the Father Almighty and with the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be. Amen.’ (59-60)

This is our prayer today, especially for Cardinal Keith Patrick O’Brien. May his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen
+Vincent Nichols

Comments invited…

Middlesbrough Diocese Embraces LGBT Industry – Bishop Sends Good Wishes…

Report on the Diocese of Middlesbrough, north-east of England…

The new diocesan outreach ministry to the LGBT+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community has now held its first Masses in York.

Some 60 participants travelled from across the diocese for the first Mass. Catholic members of the LGBT+ community were joined by their families, friends and supporters and Christians from other denominations.

All gathered in the hidden chapel of York’s historic Bar Convent, at the kind invitation of the Sisters of the Congregation of Jesus. It was noted in the words of welcome that the Bar Convent has a long history of offering sanctuary and began its life to support minorities suffering persecution by civil and religious authorities.

The presider at Mass was Father Tony Lester, who is working to establish this ministry in our diocese at the request of Bishop Terry, who sent good wishes for the launch. Father Tony was joined on the altar by Canon John Lumley and Deacon Peter Warren, together with Deacon Nick Baggio, from the Diocese of Leeds.

Mass began with a Litany of Welcome, reminding those present that all people have a place in the Christian community because all belong to Jesus Christ, and it is his table the Church gathers around at the Eucharist. It is God who counts us worthy and the welcome the Church makes visible is God’s welcome to all in Christ.

The readers included a human rights defender from Kenya who is spending six months at the University of York as a “protected fellow”, because as an LGBT activist his life is in danger at home. While in Britain he is learning ways to reduce the risks to his life and to network with fellow human rights defenders.

Sadly, his baptismal and confirmation papers were publicly torn up by his parish priest in Kenya because of the work he was doing. Father Tony acknowledged that for many LGBT+ people their experience of Church is marked by pain. Pope Francis has said this is something for which Christians need to apologise.

After Mass the congregation socialised over refreshments and people shared stories of their journey. Among the experiences shared was that of a young man who stopped attending Mass as a teenager, not because he had lost his faith but because he felt his parish community would not accept him. He was very pleased at the launch of the new ministry, which he felt gave him the opportunity to start attending Mass again.

Those who attended the launch were asked how they would like to see this ministry develop in the future. It was agreed that a Mass with an explicit welcome to the LGBT+ community, families and friends would be celebrated at the Bar Convent on the second Sunday of each month at 3pm. In time, a rotation of priests will preside at these Masses and the community that gathers will develop a broader programme that is spiritual, social and supportive.

For further information, visit lgbtmiddlesbroughcatholic.org.uk or facebook.com/lgbtcatholic.

Comment:

Is there any diocese in the UK which is standing against the all-pervasive influence, if not domination, of the LGBT industry?  If so, name that diocese – please!  Hope springs eternal! 

Feminism: Irrational & Un-Christian?

With monotonous regularity, the print and broadcasting news outlets across the UK are leading with allegations of sexual harassment of women.  Today’s news broadcasts and newspapers are no exception, devoting air-time and front pages to publishing this latest scandal 

Seems there’s hardly a decent male anywhere to be found. The presumption now is, clearly, “guilty until proven innocent” – that’s becoming more and more clear.  For a touch of balance, check out the entirely false allegation made against Tucker Carlson, popular American broadcaster, whose entire life and career was almost destroyed by a woman he’d never even met. 

Comment:

Has the feminist movement gone too far?  Are radical feminists, in fact, completely irrational women,  driven by a hatred of men and masculinity?  Why are there apparently no women in the media industry speaking out against radical feminism?  Female news anchors interviewing (the very few) women who signal some reservations about the current frenzy, react quickly and with annoyance, as if they want the allegations to be true.  What’s going on – should men be presumed guilty until proven innocent?  If so, does that apply across the board to all crimes, or merely to allegations of a sexual nature? 

Vote in the poll before sharing your thoughts 

Is The Priesthood “Un-Attractive”?

QUALITIES OF A HOLY PRIEST – From the writings of Saint John Eudes on The Priest, His Dignity And Obligations…

He is an angel purifying, illuminating and perfecting the souls that God has entrusted to him. He is a seraph sent by God to teach men the science of salvation which is concerned only with knowing and loving Almighty God and His Divine Son, Jesus Christ.
The priest is an archangel and a prince of the heavenly militia, waging constant war against the devil who strives to drag countless souls into the depths of hell.

He is the real father of the children of God, with a heart filled with love which is truly paternal. That love urges him to work unceasingly to nourish his flock with the bread of the sacred word and of the sacraments, to clothe the faithful with Christ and the Holy Ghost, to enrich them with celestial blessings and to secure for them everypossible assistance in the salvation of their souls. Above all else, the priest is the.father, the advocate, the protector and defender of the poor, widows, orphans and strangers. He is the refuge of the afflicted, of the desolate and the discouraged. He Is happy to visit and console the sorrowful, to bring them what assistance he can, taking upon himself their burdens and defending them against their oppressors.

He is a captain in the mighty army of God, always ready to battle for the glory of God and the defense of Holy Mother Church. He is ever prepared to lay siege to the world, the flesh and the devil. For him the conquest of kingdoms means only the salvation of souls for each soul is a kingdom more precious than all the empires of the world.

The priest is a prince of the realm of God, one of the kings of Christ’s empire, the Church. He is appointed to rule by the maxims and laws of the gospel as many kings and queens as there are Christians committed to his care. His duty is to make them worthy to possess in eternity the very kingdom of the Sovereign Monarch of the world.

The priest is an evangelist and an apostle whose chief work is to preach publicly and privately, by word and example, the Gospel of Jesus Christ; to continue and perpetuate the functions that the apostles were commissioned to perform, and to practise the virtues that they practised….

It is obvious that the priest is favored with far more graces than any other human being except the Blessed Virgin Mary. It follows, then, that no one on earth is held to a greater perfection and sanctity of life than the priest… Learn to hate intemperance in eating and drinking. Avoid every occasion in which sinful excesses may be committed. This vice is low and bestial and most definitely contrary to the sanctity and dignity of the priest, who should be an angel among men.

Abhor impurity. Avoid with the most scrupulous exactitude the places, persons or things which might constitute the slightest peril or suggest even the smallest shadow of that abominable vice. What could be more necessary and becoming to the life of the priest consecrated to God. the priest whose life is spent in the church near the altar, whose time is spent performing angelic functions amidst divine mysteries, what is more necessary and becoming than purity of mind and body? What can be more terrible than an impure priest? He is a monster, a Judas, an antichrist.

Consider the words of St. Paul: if any man has not care of his own, and especially of those of his house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel” (1 Tim. 5, 8). Lest, therefore, you be condemned by God as apostates, learn to rule and govern your household that it may be a shining example of virtue, modesty, charity and piety for all Christian families to behold and imitate.

Comment: 

Articles on the crisis in the Church/shortage of priests, written from the modernist perspective, tend to present the priesthood as “un-attractive”. Always, as well as insisting on more lay involvement, power etc., they refer to the need to encourage more men to become priests, with the rider that the priesthood needs to be made more attractive. 

That’s never spelt out.  So, reading the vision of St John Eudes, a priest himself, on the qualities and duties of a Catholic priest, made me wonder if the description above would be “attractive” to young men considering the priesthood today.  Personally, I think it would,  certainly for those with a traditional Catholic formation and spirituality, but I think those demanding a “more attractive” priesthood, really mean an easier life for priests, less demanding.  Or,  am I being cynical again?  

The Morality of Match-Making…

From time to time, I find myself in the role of Agony Aunt, asked my opinion about matters romantic (believe it or not)  by young people who are single, would like to be married, but every time they think they’ve found Mr or Miss Right, turns out their first name is Always.  Or, in some other way, they are just not suited.  There is a particular difficulty, too, in finding a sound Catholic spouse.   More than once, I’ve found myself suggesting that while it’s all well and good leaving everything to Divine Providence, and it’s especially beneficial to pray to St Joseph,  it doesn’t do any harm to help things  along by – say, for argument’s sake – signing up to a Catholic dating site online.  Like, for example, this one

Nothing is to be lost, and possibly, a husband/wife gained.  I’ve known happily married couples who met in precisely this way.  Thing is, I’m wondering if it’s wrong to suggest that route to young people – IS it morally acceptable for young Catholics to use such sites? Should I stick to my day job (which is washing the dishes, vacuuming and keeping this blog afloat) or should I make a permanent move to Marriage Counselling?  😀  

Whenever I’ve suggested this possibility to young people, I’ve nearly always met with the shock-horror question: but, if I meet someone, how will I say we met?  I know how I answer that – but what about you? 

In summary, a serious subject, yes, but it also gives us the opportunity for some light relief before we close down for the last week of Advent, on Sunday next.  So, your advice and thoughts welcome, but also some jokes and fun on the topic and related subjects, if you wish. 

Comments invited…

 

 

 

 

Irish Eyes Are Surely Smiling Now!

The Catholics of Ireland are invited to gather, on November 26, 2017, on the shores of the Island to recite the holy rosary, for the preservation of the Catholic faith and the life of the unborn child, in a political context where abortion could be legalized in 2018.

The generous response of the Irish, attached to the faith of their ancestors, was not long in coming: in a few days, more than a hundred meeting points had to be planned to allow the smooth running of this religious event.

Thus, after Poland and Italy, which saw millions of Catholics gather at the borders to recite the rosary, it is now Ireland’s turn to erect a living rampart of rosaries on November 26, 2017.

For its part, the Irish District of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Pius X joins this initiative and plans to organize four assembly points in the country.

The recitation of the rosary will begin at 14:30 on November 26, with the main purpose of preserving the faith and the fight against abortion. In 2018, indeed, the Irish will be called to the polls to decide whether or not they wish to amend Article 8 of their Constitution which protects the life of the unborn child.  Source

Comment: 

The speedy and generous response of the Irish to the invitation to pray the rosary around the country in defence of the Faith and the unborn child, gives us great hope for this once deeply Catholic land.  So, to those of you who are free to join the Irish at any of the meeting points, we say, please do! Here are the contact details for the Irish District of the SSPX, for anyone seeking to make enquiries.  I presume the linked details are up to date.