Maria Goretti Was A Martyr For Purity – So Why Not Say So, Pope Francis?

.- Pope Francis has marked the feast of the young martyr St. Maria Goretti by calling the faithful to follow her example and be forgiving to those who wrong them.

The memory of Maria Goretti’s example should “encourage you to commit yourselves, like the Saint you venerate, to being witnesses of forgiveness,” the Pope wrote in a letter for the July 6 feast of the  Italian who is known for having forgiven her attacker…

Pope Francis also compared the trials experienced by the Goretti family with those faced by families today, such as poverty and forced migration.

“Poverty and the urgent need for work pushed the Goretti to immigrate from their native Corinaldo,” the Pope said.

Francis compared the “tears and poverty” which accompanied the Goretti family’s migration to the journeys made by families for “the most varied reasons,” including poverty.

“It is a situation which makes us feel every closer to this girl,” the Pope reflected. Read entire report here

Comment

While it is, of course, perfectly correct to honour the great charity shown by St Maria Goretti who forgave her attacker, it seems odd that the Pope would emphasise the saint’s wonderful forgiveness without emphasising, equally, that she is very much a saint for our times – our highly sexualised and promiscuous times. She is a wonderful role model for young people today, both boys and girls, who are faced, relentlessly, with temptations to sin against purity, day and daily.

So, that’s odd, in itself, that no great emphasis is placed on that key aspect of the martyrdom of Maria Goretti by Pope Francis. But there’s something else. Her attacker was later able to reveal that when she was fighting off his advances, Maria did so, not only for her own safety, but for his salvation. She told him over and over, that he was risking his soul.  

What a superb role model for everyone tempted to put sexual gratification before the Laws of God. Think divorced and “remarried” and all the other souls being led astray by the Amoris Laetitia mindset, fooled into thinking that they’re not really sinning at all.  

Why would the Pope omit these key considerations from his reflection on the life and death of the lovely little Saint and Martyr, Maria Goretti whose Feast was celebrated on 6th July.    Why? 

Pope Francis: Mother Teresa Canonisation Approved…

Pope Francis has approved of the second miracle of Mother Teresa, thereby clearing the way for her sainthood.  mother-teresa-quotes-12

On 15 December he received the final approval of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints meeting.

The canonisation is expected to be sometime later next year. 

Speaking to Sky News, Thomas D’Souza, the Archbishop of Kolkata, a city which Mother Teresa made her home, said: “We are very happy and overjoyed with this news, the city of Kolkata has been waiting for this day. We thank God of the great gift he bestowed on us with Mother Teresa.”

According to a statement from the Vatican, the second miracle involved a Brazilian man with a viral brain infection that resulted in multiple abscesses with triventricular hydrocephalus.

In December 2008 the patient was in a coma and dying and various treatments had been ineffective.

The patient’s wife is said to have continuously sought the intercession of Mother Teresa for her husband

He was wheeled into the operating theatre for emergency surgery at 18:10 on 9 December 2008 .

At the same time, his wife went to her church and along with the pastor begged Mother Teresa for the cure of her dying husband.

At 18:40 the neurosurgeon returned to the operating room and found the patient inexplicably awake and without pain.

He asked the doctor: “What I am doing here?”

The next morning he was examined, fully awake and without any headache.

On 10 September this year, the medical commission voted unanimously that his cure was inexplicable in the light of current medical knowledge.

The man, now completely healed, resumed his work as a mechanical engineer without any particular limitation.  Source

Comment

Is this latest canonisation to be welcomed? Mother Teresa was certainly keen to help the poor, and was enthusiastic about making the world a better place: to her credit, she spoke out clearly against abortion, even in the presence of politicians. The miracle recounted above seems pretty convincing. Is all of that enough for canonisation? Should we be celebrating?