29/6: Feast of SS Peter & Paul – Is Pope Putting Brakes On Dissent in Germany?

Vatican City, Jun 27, 2020 : Pope Francis “appreciates” the German Church’s “Synodal Way,” the president of the German bishops’ conference said after meeting with the pope Saturday.

In a statement following his private audience with the pope June 27, Bishop Georg Bätzing said: “I feel strengthened by the intensive exchange with the Holy Father to continue on the path we have taken. The pope appreciates this project, which he associates closely with the concept of ‘synodality’ which he coined.”

He continued: “It was a matter of concern to me to make it clear that the Church in Germany is following this path and always knows that she is bound to the universal Church.”

Bätzing traveled to the Vatican the day after the German Church released figures showing that it lost a record number of members in 2019.

The statistics, issued June 26, showed that 272,771 people exited the Catholic Church last year, a significant increase on the 2018 figure of 216,078.

In Bätzing’s own diocese of Limburg, 9,439 people left the Catholic Church in 2019, 1,459 more than in 2018.

Bätzing said Saturday: “We must find answers to urgent challenges facing the Church, ranging from coming to terms with sexual abuse of minors to the dramatic numbers of people leaving the Church.” ….

Referring to a 28-page letter that Pope Francis wrote last year to German Catholics, Bätzing said: “With his letter to the pilgrim people of God of the Church in Germany in June 2019, he encouraged and gave indications. He will continue to accompany us attentively.”

The pope’s letter was prompted by the German bishops’ decision to launch a two-year “Synodal Way,” bringing together lay people and bishops to discuss four main topics: the way power is exercised in the Church; sexual morality; the priesthood; and the role of women.

The German bishops initially said that the process would end with a series of “binding” votes — raising concerns at the Vatican that the resolutions might challenge the Church’s teaching and discipline.

In his letter, the pope suggested that participants in the “Synodal Way” faced a particular “temptation.”

“At the basis of this temptation, there is the belief that the best response to the many problems and shortcomings that exist is to reorganize things, change them and ‘put them back together’ to bring order and make ecclesial life easier by adapting it to the current logic or that of a particular group,” he wrote…  [emphasis added].

In May, Bätzing expressed the hope that the results of Germany’s “Synodal Way” would be discussed at a synod in Rome.

He said he was “very much in favor of transporting to Rome, to the level of the whole Church, the insights and decisions that we garner from the Synodal Process — also with regard to [the role of] women and ecclesial ministry” …

After his meeting with Pope Francis, he said he looked forward to a meeting of the world’s bishops in Rome in October 2022, which will be dedicated to the theme “For a synodal Church: communion, participation and mission.”

He said: “I hope that with the experiences of the Synodal Way we can make a contribution to the world Synod of Bishops in October 2022, which will deal with the question of synodality.”   Click here to read entire piece at Catholic World Report

Comment:

While Pope Francis appears to sound a warning note about the danger of the “Synodal Way” (which is, at least, arguably designed to encourage dissent), he does, at the same time, seem to approve it.  Allowing the topics listed to be raised and debated, such as the role of women (when female ordination is out of the question, cannot happen), could be interpreted as Pope Francis giving the green light to dissent. 

So, which is it?  Is he encouraging dissent or putting the brakes on the already dissent-ridden Church in Germany?

On this Feast of SS Peter & Paul, when we celebrate the Gospel account of Our Lord’s entrusting of the keys of the Kingdom to Peter,  we might assess the pontificate of Pope Francis.  Raise any relevant issues of interest and/or concern in the comments, but above all, let’s remember to pray especially for Pope Francis today.  

31 responses

  1. Pope Francis, I’m sorry to say, is adept at speaking out of both sides of his mouth. I’m sure he has invited Bishop Batzing (who dresses like a Lutheran pastor) and his fellow German apostates to develop a more subtle way of memorializing their heresies. Perhaps we can call it the “Subtle Synodal Way,” instead of merely the “Synodal Way.” Or even more to the point, the “Sneaky Synodal Way.” It’s all in the footnotes…

    Also worth pointing out that it was the German hierarchy – you know, those prelates who refused to shake Pope Benedict’s hand at the airport years ago – who was largely responsible for Bergoglio’s election. So this image of who is pulling whose strings should be reversed: the public sees the Pope putting the brakes on potential schism, but those with eyes to see have an entirely different image in mind. That is, behind-the-scenes collusion among those who have surrendered the Church to the world and to the Satanic United Nations/New World Order.

    Confusion continues to reign in the Barque, and we are the ones who will pay for it. The foxes are guarding the henhouse.

    • RCA Victor

      I’d forgotten about that handshake so I went onto YouTube and watched it again. How humbly Pope Benedict just continued to offer his hand after each rejection. What a nasty bunch of bishops, very nasty.

      I remember them saying that they would act independently of Rome, so they are a bunch of schismatics.

  2. Terms such as “a synodal Church: communion, participation and mission”, “Synodal Way” and “the pilgrim people of God” all derive from Protestantism. The Protestants were always using terms like this in order to appear relevant, now it’s the Catholics who are using them to appear relevant. It’s quite obvious why the Church in Germany is leaking souls in a flood, it’s because most of the hierarchy and many of the priests have lost the Catholic Faith. They are effectively Protestants.

    Pope Francis may appear to be setting this German hierarchy straight in regard to its limits but it’s a superficial admonition. He encourages dissent on the one hand and on the other hints at a warning against it. This is what happens with Modernists and their double speak, they pretend to be orthodox while inviting heterodoxy or heresy.

  3. Happy Feast of SS Peter & Paul, folks.

    Agree fully with both comments so far,

    RCA Victor,

    Thank you for that reminder about the German bishops refusing to shake Pope Benedict’s hand at the airport. Disgraceful.

    Athanasius,

    The reason for the loss of Catholics in significant numbers is obvious, as you say. If the clergy don’t believe, why should the laity? Tragic.

  4. Happy Feast everyone!

    I agree that Pope Francis is speaking out of both sides of his mouth, as usual. He should be shutting down the “Synodal Way” and telling the Germans to live their lives as members of the Universal Church not the “German” Church.

    Francis does need our prayers today God help us all if his pontificate lasts much longer.

  5. Very sad and troubling news.

    Gabriel Syme kindly emailed to let me know of a fresh scandal in the Archdiocese of Glasgow.

    Father Neil McGarrity has been arrested and charged in connection with child sex offences spanning over a number of years, taking place between December 2017 and March 2020.
    https://www.glasgowtimes.co.uk/news/18548464.parish-priest-suspended-allegations-child-sex-offences/?ref=ar

    He has been responsible for two parishes, and is now suspended, of course, so please pray for him especially today when we are remembering the importance of praying for the Pope and the Church.

    My own first comment on hearing this news is one which I’m sure will be echoed on this blog: when, on earth, is all of this horror going to end?

    • Editor

      Yes, the Church just keeps on getting hit with one bad news story after another. Many more prayers are needed.

        • Editor

          What’s even more incredible is that the hierarchy can’t see the state of the Church, they’re still singing the praises of Vatican II. Never known such blindness.

          • Athanasius,

            Cynic that I am, I think the hierarchy does see the state of the Church, and here’s the kicker: this state, I’d wager, is what most of them want, especially the homosexuals and her internal enemies. If the rest don’t want it, they are apparently being cowed by threats into silence.

            In other words, they’re singing the praises of Vatican II for public consumption, to prop up their veneer – even as they disembowel what’s behind the veneer, i.e. Tradition.

            As Leslie Nielsen said in The Naked Gun: “Nothing to see here!”

            Similarly, to those who bemoan the endless fruitless failures of “ecumenism,” I assert that those failures are actually successful: successful in denaturing the Catholic Faith and surrendering what’s left of it to the world. That was the real purpose of ecumenism, after all.

            • RCAVictor

              You may be right but I’ve always seen the situation similar to how things are going in the world right now, which is to say a small, powerful and corrupt elite who pull all the strings. The many obey either out of cowardice or blindness. I would prefer this to be the case than the other scenario, large scale corruption throughout the hierarchy.

    • Editor,

      Glasgow is a terrible diocese. In fact, the whole Scottish Church is in a terrible state due to sexually active priests, especially homosexually active priests.

      I want to say a word about the good priests, though, the ones who are remaining faithful to their promise of celibacy – they must get really tired and upset when these reports appear, and also when they know about these situations going on and the bishops are doing nothing about them. Those bishops are a disgrace and as far as I’m aware, there are not truly good bishops in the whole of Scotland. What a terrible thought.

    • Editor,

      Maybe, when the Consecration of Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary has been carried out by the Pope and Bishops. So far, they have been obstinate and unbelieving in this matter. We know that it will be done, but, the horror of it all is just how late that Consecration will take place.

  6. That’s really shocking about Fr McGarrity. I also ask how long will this horror continue. There seems to be no sign of it stopping.

    • Josephine,

      Exactly. And you would think that at this stage, the penny would drop in the heads of all concerned that this kind of behaviour, if it turns out to the true, is just not going to go unpunished – even in this world. What will it take?

  7. Interesting that the German faithful are leaving the Church in droves. Surely that must have a significant effect on the coffers of the German hierarchy, since they are funded by the State.

    Which means that Pope Francis’ coffers are also feeling the pain – that is, unless his coffers are continually being refreshed by his deal with Communist China….

    • Dear Editor,

      Once again our great American blogger has got to the nitty gritty. It may not be commonly known, but in Germany the church’s are financed by the state.
      In other words you have to basically state your religion on your tax returns and the identified church then receives its stipend – or something.
      This has the added “benefit” of being able to count the number of Catholics.
      So yes, they are feeling the financial pinch with more people declining to “vote” catholic.
      On the matter of Fr McGarrity – may God in Heaven look down with healing on our Mother Church.
      I cannot help but remember the anti catholic witch hunt which almost destroyed one of our greatest Cardinals – George Pell. So we would be prudent to wait till things pan out before making our minds up on Fr McGarrity.

      • Patrick

        Of course we must not rush to particular judgment; and I am hoping sincerely that these allegations are not true, but the very fact that such allegations are still hitting the headlines is dispiriting. Nobody here is “making our minds up” about Fr McGarrity – the legal process will take its course, but it is only right to seek prayers for him, wouldn’t you agree, as we did for Cardinal Pell?

        • Dear Editor

          Of course I agree with you that we should hope the allegations should be decided on factual evidence. Despite my pessimism on many matters political I still have some trust in our judicial system.
          Not so much on the Masonic police.
          But yes, let us pray for the One True Apostolic Faith and its beleaguered priests, and especially Fr McGarrity.

  8. I am totally sick of this pope’s double-speak.

    It’s his job to quell all dissent – not encourage synods to debate and discuss how to change Christ’s teaching.

    He’s a dreadful pope and I can’t wait for him to be gone.

    • Helen

      It’s an excellent interview. What Archbishop Vigano recognises is that Vatican II was infiltrated by the enemies of Our Lord, servants of Lucifer, which explains the devious intelligence behind the construction of cleverly worded documents that were later used to destroy the Mass and the faith.

      There is no question in my mind that when we have an orthodox Pope back on the Throne of Peter Vatican II will be revisited and condemned. There will be a new Council, a dogmatic one, that will re-establish truth. I think this is what Archbishop Vigano foresees also.

    • Helen,

      That is a brilliant interview – thank you so much for posting it.

      I may, in fact, use it to launch a fresh thread on the topic of Vatican II because most of our fellow Catholics will never read that.

      Another plus is that Catholic Culture itself has come along in leaps and bounds. At one time, Phil Lawlor would no more have published such an interview (let alone conducted it) that try to fly to Mars.

      So thank you again.

  9. As usual I firmly agree with Athanasius. It is only my firm belief in the words of Jesus that he is with us until the end of time that keeps me from utter despair.

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