Year of Mercy: What About Us?

Given this report of a full pardon to be granted to everyone involved in procuring and providing abortions to mark the Year of Mercy, we call upon Pope Francis to abandon his opposition to Catholic Tradition and to order all priests around the world to provide Traditional Latin Masses in every parish, to mark the Year of Mercy for those of us who prefer it to the Bugnini concoction .  Surely adherence to the Mass that has served the Church for centuries, which has nourished saints and given us martyrs, is not worse than murdering unborn babies?TradMasswithsaintscolour[Pope Francis] made a quite strong statement [about the ancient Mass] when he said that he understands when the old generation returns to what it experienced, but that he cannot understand the younger generation wishing to return to it. “When I search more thoroughly – the Pope said – I find that it is rather a kind of fashion [in Czech: ‘móda‘]. And if it is a fashion, therefore it is a matter that does not need that much attention. Source

Comments invited

22 responses

  1. In the past, I’ve had good reason to suspect that bloggers skim the introductory article and may not always read the links. Very naughty!

    With that in mind, I wish to highlight here the fact that the link to the Mail Online article (click “See this report” above) gives the impression that – as he did at the outset of his pontificate when he told us all not to “obsess” about it, Pope Francis appears to be minimising the gravity of procured abortion.

    Maybe I’m mis-reading it, I sincerely hope so.

    It certainly seems that Pope Francis is keen to win the approval of every miscreant in the book, while not caring a hoot about his patent lack of mercy and compassion towards those now dubbed as “traditional” Catholics (i.e. the ones who believe it all!)

    It’s not on, Papa Francis. It’s not ON!

  2. Far be it from me to excuse Pope Francis for his inability to engage brain before opening mouth, but here (with fear and trembling, Ed!) I think we have a classic case of the media’s ignorant take on what he said, and the unwarranted assumptions they routinely make. The Pope is able, for certain serious reasons, to devolve onto priests the power, normally reserved to the Holy See to give absolution for certain serious sins, and he is doing no more than this. The impression given in the article is that the sin is to be forgiven without the usual contrition, firm purpose of amendment, etc., and he has fatally failed to make this clear. It is all part and parcel of the huge modernist heresy that God is all mercy without justice. It is leading countless souls to hell.

    • Christina,

      I hope you are right but with this pope you never know.

      We do know that he wants to please everyone except traditional Catholics, so I hope someone mentions this blog to him! A Mass in every parish would be a real act of mercy.

    • Christina

      It shouldn’t be necessary to create special priestly “missionaries of mercy” to wander the earth doling out absolution in these – or any other – cases. Any such special powers could be devolved to parish priests.

      I smell a rat.

      • Therese,

        I agree. This is another “mercy” stunt, which results in people thinking a sin is no longer a sin.

    • Islamic Crusader

      That’s not a username I would expect any Catholic to choose, to be honest. Forgive me for saying.

      It’s a very interesting article especially the stats on black abortions. That is really shocking. I agree with the Sheriff, people should be outside those abortion clinics protesting on that issue.

      • To see the explanation for it read Hilaire Belloc’s Heresies Chapter 4 The Great and Enduring Heresy of Mohammed; which seventy years after the book was published, appears to have been revived in its militant form and murdering Christians in the Near East and North Africa and destroying Our Cultural History.
        In the 19th Century, the Papacy had its own Papal Legions to defend the Holy See, even Pope Francis has recognised that a force needs to be raised to defend Christendom, both in prayer and in action..

        • I take your point, but I think Lepanto would be more appropriate, if you don’t mind me saying. I just don’t like to see “Islamic” as part of a username on a Catholic blog, and this is a very Catholic blog!

        • I’d also like to see the exact words Pope Francis used, as it doesn’t ring true to me that he would want anything like a crusading army to defend Christendom against Islam – he’s even said atheists can get to heaven without converting so why would he worry about Islam? Sorry, but I think with respect you must have misunderstood him or maybe I missed it.

          • http://www.cruxnow.com/church/2015/03/13/vatican-backs-military-force-to-stop-isis-genocide/
            Vatican backs military force to stop ISIS ‘genocide’

            comment on this story 48
            By John L. Allen Jr.
            Associate editor March 13, 2015
            In an unusually blunt endorsement of military action, the Vatican’s top diplomat at the United Nations in Geneva has called for a coordinated international force to stop the “so-called Islamic State” in Syria and Iraq from further assaults on Christians and other minority groups.

            “We have to stop this kind of genocide,” said Italian Archbishop Silvano Tomasi, the Vatican’s representative in Geneva. “Otherwise we’ll be crying out in the future about why we didn’t so something, why we allowed such a terrible tragedy to happen.”

            Tomasi said that any anti-ISIS coalition has to include the Muslim states of the Middle East, and can’t simply be a “Western approach.” He also said it should unfold under the aegis of the United Nations.

            The call for force is striking, given that the Vatican traditionally has opposed military interventions in the Middle East, including the two US-led Gulf Wars. It builds, however, on comments from Pope Francis that the use of force is “legitimate … to stop an unjust aggressor.”

            Tomasi issued the call in an interview with Crux on the same day he presented a statement entitled “Supporting the Human Rights of Christians and Other Communities, particularly in the Middle East,” coauthored with the Russian Federation and Lebanon, to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

            The statement has drawn almost 70 nations as signatories, including the United States.
            Vatican backs military force to stop ISIS ‘genocide’

            Share on Twitter Share on Facebook email this story comment on this story 48
            By John L. Allen Jr.
            Associate editor March 13, 2015
            In an unusually blunt endorsement of military action, the Vatican’s top diplomat at the United Nations in Geneva has called for a coordinated international force to stop the “so-called Islamic State” in Syria and Iraq from further assaults on Christians and other minority groups.

            “We have to stop this kind of genocide,” said Italian Archbishop Silvano Tomasi, the Vatican’s representative in Geneva. “Otherwise we’ll be crying out in the future about why we didn’t so something, why we allowed such a terrible tragedy to happen.”

            Tomasi said that any anti-ISIS coalition has to include the Muslim states of the Middle East, and can’t simply be a “Western approach.” He also said it should unfold under the aegis of the United Nations.

            The call for force is striking, given that the Vatican traditionally has opposed military interventions in the Middle East, including the two US-led Gulf Wars. It builds, however, on comments from Pope Francis that the use of force is “legitimate … to stop an unjust aggressor.”

            Tomasi issued the call in an interview with Crux on the same day he presented a statement entitled “Supporting the Human Rights of Christians and Other Communities, particularly in the Middle East,” coauthored with the Russian Federation and Lebanon, to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

            The statement has drawn almost 70 nations as signatories, including the United States.
            John L. Allen Jr. is associate editor of Crux, specializing in coverage of the Vatican and the Catholic Church.

            He has written nine books on the Vatican and Catholic affairs, and also is a popular speaker on Catholicism both in the United States and internationally.

            The London Tablet has called John “the most authoritative writer on Vatican affairs in the English language,” and renowned papal biographer George Weigel has called him “the best Anglophone Vatican reporter ever.” When John was called upon to put the first question to Pope Benedict XVI aboard the papal plane en route to the United States in April 2008, the Vatican spokesman said to the pope: “Holy Father, this man needs no introduction.”

            That’s not just a Vatican judgment. Veteran religion writer Kenneth Woodward of Newsweek described John as “the journalist other reporters – and not a few cardinals – look to for the inside story on how all the pope’s men direct the world’s largest church.”

            His work is admired across ideological divides. Liberal commentator Fr. Andrew Greeley calls his writing “indispensable,” while the late Fr. Richard John Neuhaus, a conservative, called his reporting “possibly the best source of information on the Vatican published in the United States.” John’s weekly column, “All Things Catholic,” is widely read as a source of insight on the global Church.

            Among John’s books are “Opus Dei: An Objective Look Behind the Myths and Reality of the Most Controversial Force in the Catholic Church”, and two about Pope Benedict XVI. The first was written before Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger became pope; the other came after Benedict’s election to the papacy and was the first biography of the Pope in English.

            John is an associate editor of The Boston Globe, which carries his Sunday column, All Things Catholic. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, CNN, NPR, The Tablet, Jesus, Second Opinion, The Nation, the Miami Herald, Die Furche, and the Irish Examiner.

            He is a senior Vatican analyst for CNN, and was a correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter for 16 years.

            John, a native of Kansas, received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Fort Hays State University and a master’s degree in religious studies from the University of Kansas. For several years, he taught journalism at Notre Dame High School in Sherman Oaks, California and also supervised the student-run newspaper, The Knight.

            He received an honorary degree, Doctor of Sacred Letters (D.S.Litt.), from the University of St. Michael’s College in Toronto, Ontario in 2011.

            OK maybe not the Pope himself but I doubt this is a rogue comment. I think putting pro-Jihad, Sharia law states in the international force is a non-starter as the backers of Isis will already be in that force.

  3. Comments to my previous e-mail: In which good comments are made illustrating the points to consider.
    http://www.cruxnow.com/church/2015/03/13/vatican-backs-military-force-to-stop-isis-genocide/
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    la catholic state • 2 months ago
    The question is….why isn’t Saudi Arabia already fighting ISIS. Saudi has a massive army….while ISIS consists of 30.000 militia?!

    And the question the Vatican must answer is what happens if the West and Muslim nations refuse to confront ISIS. Yesterday…ISIS attacked Christian towns in the Khabour region and overwhelmed the badly armed Christian and Kurdish militia there. But there was no help from the US air force as there was when Kobani was attacked. This inaction from the West in defence of Christian towns is a very distressing fact that the Vatican must acknowledge. The Vatican must garner support from without the West ie Russia and even China. Why doesn’t the Pope ask the Italian government to aid the Christians defending their towns, by air strikes?!
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    mollysdad la catholic state • 2 months ago
    Saudi won’t fight because its soldiers would switch sides as soon as they deployed.
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    Laurence Charles Ringo mollysdad • 2 months ago
    I must confess to being somewhat surprised that the Saudis even have an army,having never seen any such army in action anywhere…Hmm…anyone?
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    Guest Laurence Charles Ringo • 2 months ago
    Yes, the Saudis have an army, air force, and navy. The US has a military base in Saudi Arabia and has been supplying arms to them for some time. The Saudis have one step below the best grade of US weapons. They are a trusted ally who will invest in their defense.

    During the initial US-led coalition (the first of its type in the history of the world assembled by President Obama) a Saudi female pilot participated in the attack. She was given press coverage which brought about death threats so, the Saudis & the western press are keeping a much lower profile.
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    Laurence Charles Ringo Guest • 2 months ago
    Thanks for bringing me up to speed on this issue,PaulofTarsus!!–God bless.
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    Martlet Guest • 2 months ago
    And not to forget that the Saudi army played a large part in the Gulf War – in a coalition put together by Bush the Elder.

    As a point of interest (to me, at any rate) I read that ISIS fighters dread being killed by a woman, which in part explains why they couldn’t take Kobani. Seems it is a pox on their eternal destiny if a woman dispatches them.
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    ricefields Martlet • 2 months ago
    The US airstrikes were a tremendous help, but the tide started to turn when Kurdistan sent Peshmerga with heavy artillery, which is what the Kobani defenders sorely needed. They only had light arms.
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    Martlet ricefields • 2 months ago
    I know. I followed every awful moment. Such brave fighters.
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    ricefields Guest • 2 months ago
    I don’t think the female pilot was a Saudi. I think she was from the United Arab Emirates.
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    Guest ricefields • 2 months ago
    you are correct.
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    Happy Jack mollysdad • 2 months ago
    ‘Jihadism’ is the ‘Wahhabi’ strain of Sunni Islam. It emanates from the 18th-century, Muhammed ibn Abd al-Wahhab in Saudi Arabia. They are known as ‘Salafists’ Their aim is to purge the land of decadence and purify their religion of error, idolatry and superstition. You the theological mission of al-Qaeda, al-Nusra, the Taliban or ISIS is inspired by the Salafists and historically have been patronised by the House of Saud.

    Saudi Arabia in not a long term ally of the Christian West.
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    Mark la catholic state • 2 months ago
    Because the US, Saudi Arabia, and Israel profit off of ISIS. US airstrikes “against ISIS” were actually US airstrikes on Syrian oil infrastructure.
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    Martlet la catholic state • 2 months ago
    There were no airstrikes to assist Kobani during the first weeks. It has nothing to do with the faith of the inhabitants and everything to do with strategy. Only when Kobani managed to hold out did it get any assistance.
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    la catholic state Martlet • 2 months ago
    Actually I’ve just found out there were some airstrikes late last night by US forces. But I don’t agree with you. I believe there is a strong anti-Christian streak in Western nations and the UN. There is a secular/Islamic cabal.
    I wish the Christian militia had even a small air force.
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    ricefields la catholic state • 2 months ago
    There are Christian militias forming, but they need arms and aren’t getting them.
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    la catholic state ricefields • 2 months ago
    I agree with you totally. Though now they are crowdfunding. We must help them all we can. I really pray for a strong and permanent Christian army in the Middle East….and by God’s grace…a Christian homeland in the Ninevah plains.

    People can help them here…. https://www.grouprev.com/resto
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    Zorkinian la catholic state • 2 months ago
    An Israel for Christians? That’ll turn out well…
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    la catholic state ricefields • 2 months ago
    Yes….the spitefulness of the West and the UN means these Christian people are being ignored. However they are crowdfunding now….and we can help them here …. https://www.grouprev.com/resto…. God willing.
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    ricefields Martlet • 2 months ago
    Actually I think it’s because of the intense outcry to help Kobani. The US said several times that Kobani had no strategic value.
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    Martlet ricefields • 2 months ago
    Agreed.
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    Guest la catholic state • 2 months ago
    A better understanding of the situation will help you answer many of your questions. Saudi Arabia is now fighting the ISIL and have been for months. They are part of the US coalition. The Saudis don’t fight ISIL directly because they have not been invited into Iraq and Syria. Iran is supporting both Iraq and Syria.
    The West is NOT refusing to confront ISIL. The difficulty with sending airstrikes to help the Kurds is lack of military communication to identify enemy positions. The US did bomb Kobani only after communications were established. The US bombed most of the buildings in Kobani because the civilians fled – that is not true in other cases.
    The Vatican has no real relationship with either Russia of China. The Catholic Church is persecuted in China no Vatican ties exist. Russia follows the Russian Orthodox Church and will not go against it to help Vatican City. The West is doing as much as possible to help Christians and innocent civilians against ISIL but it can not be everywhere all the time. These are huge countries.
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    la catholic state Guest • 2 months ago
    The West is refusing to confront ISIS. This is understandable given their failure in Islamic countries in the past. However….compare it to their enthusiasm for war with Russia…and Assad. The West is inclined to support Islamists….and ignore or make war with Christians.

    The Vatican needs to face the fact of a West hostile to Christianity….not merely indifferent to Christianity. And then make plans accordingly. There is no bad blood between Putin and the Pope. And many of the Christians in the Middle East are Orthodox. Yet the Pope still calls for help on behalf of all Christians. All Christian nations (and few are left) must help. Secular post-Christian nations are the most inert. The West is not lifting a finger for persecuted Christians. In fact….they pay vast sums in aid to Christian-persecuting nations….without a twinge of guilt.
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    Guest la catholic state • 2 months ago
    It sounds as if you need to get yourself over to the front lines and handle things yourself. you claim to have all the answers then get to it. Get of the keyboard, get out of your seat and get to it. If you have such a commitment and do not act then you are as guilty as those at whom you point your finger.
    Ha ha – Putin has been missing for a week. He’s been busy killing Christians in Ukraine and denying he sent Russian troops into Eastern Ukraine. Putin does not need the pope to help Orthodox Christians in the Middle East. He and the Orthodox church are capable of doing it all by themselves. Why don’t they? Why haven’t they approached Pope Francis? They know more about the situation than you. Ask yourself, why don’t they help? I’ll end it here.
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    la catholic state Guest • 2 months ago
    If I could I certainly would. But I would only be in the way.
    And Putin is back actually. Outsmarting the West again. I have tweeted Pope Francis many times. But sadly the Vatican seems hell bent on blindly putting all their trust in the UN. What the Vatican need to answer (and this is back to my first point)….is what happens when the UN refuse to act in defence of Christians. The Vatican needs a plan B.
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    Guest la catholic state • 2 months ago
    No – you will not be in the way. You will provide moral support. You will pray. You will be the water boy keeping the fighting men and women from being thirsty. You can cook and clean their dirty laundry. You can represent the West and tell them all good things.
    You completely dismiss what Putin and the Russian Orthodox Church should be doing… why? Yes, Putin is back – but, for how long? He has some serious headwinds confronting him. Oil is again below $50/barrel, inflation @ 16%, ruble devalued to 50% in less than one year and worth $.02/$1 – that’s 2 cents! Russian economy is in decline with 0 growth this year and a recession predicted for 2016. Bottom line I would not want to be in Putin’s shoes. Though he does have a reported 200 Billion ruble stash and a 31 y.o. pregnant girlfriend who is 1/2 his age. He dumped his wife not long ago…. great Orthodox Christian your man Putin.
    How does a disappearing act outsmart the West? The West watches and waits. An Irish saying “Better the devil you know than the devil you don’t”. The West knows Putin and can deal with his childish, silly nonsense.
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    la catholic state Guest • 2 months ago
    Putin…for all his faults…should be a Christian ally of the Christian West. But he isn’t….because the West isn’t Christian anymore.

    In fact…most of the West hates Putin because he still has some semblance of Christian sensibilities.
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    Guest la catholic state • 2 months ago
    WRONG………. again.
    Re-read my post about Putin putting his lovely wife away and having a child – unmarried of course – with a beautiful, sweet young woman 1/2 his age.
    Putin is a joke – the whole world laughs at him. Not just the West but, CHINA which is much more powerful than Russia. Russia fears China. It is China who will own Russia and Putin knows this. China is making trade deals to buy Russian oil and gas at pennies on the dollar. China knows Putin needs the money to feed starving Russian peasants so they don’t revolt. So, China smells Putin as a weak, wounded animal and will devour Putin and Russia along with him.
    You seem like a Russian Internet Troll paid peanuts by Putin and his gang of thieves. Though you have no real knowledge about which you attempt to comment. I will end it here.
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    la catholic state Guest • 2 months ago
    Putin’s private life is not Christian….but many of our Western leaders lead exemplary married lives….but promote all kinds of unChristian alternatives to their people. Putin at least recognises that he is a sinner….and doesn’t try to legitimise his sins or those of others.
    The Pope needs to build a coalition of Christian leaders willing to help and act in defence of Christians and Christianity. Putin is the best of a bad lot so far. Maybe if Santorum gets elected?!…..
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    Guest • 2 months ago
    We should paint Papa Frank’s visage on a tomahawk missile, with the caption: “Remember Regensburg?”
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    ricefields Guest • 2 months ago
    Why Papa Frank? Why not Papa Benedict?
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    Guest • 2 months ago

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    jsosia • 2 months ago
    Finally, thank you Archbishop Silvio Tomasi for the clear statement as to the Vatican’s position. ISIS must be stopped!
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    ATF45 • 2 months ago
    The world could come together on this and the Vatican may be the voice that unites. Thank God!

    A statement with such wide support“Supporting the Human Rights of Christians and Other Communities, particularly in the Middle East”

    Dare we hope? A statement coauthored with Russia and Lebanon, signed by 70 nations including the US. Dare we hope that Middle Eastern nations will participate in an effort to stop ISIL?

    Pray. We can hope in prayer. “Christians, Yazidis, Shi’ites, Sunis, Alawites, all are human beings whose rights deserve to be protected.” Pray for all to learn to live in peach.
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    ricefields ATF45 • 2 months ago
    Wholeheartedly agree.
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    FW Ken ATF45 • 2 months ago
    I would have left “Christians out of the title. Otherwise, I agree wholeheartedly.

    We all bleed red.
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    la catholic state FW Ken • 2 months ago
    I disagree. Christians have a duty to other Christians especially where they are a persecuted minority. Or to those in more need.
    As Galatians says….do good to all, especially your brothers in Christ.
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    LHouse • 2 months ago
    “It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets.”
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    Jj Tirado Guest • 2 months ago
    Nope, as an atheist I have to answer this, even if it means becoming the devil’s advocate. What is at stake here is nothing less than GENOCIDE and there is a universal mandate (or International Mandate, if you will) for every nation to act against it. It’s in the 1948 Convention against Genocide. The Archobishop is only echoing what is already solid International Law. The rests has no bearing in this.

    By the way: “iron maidens” are fake. They never existed. They are only figments of the imagination. You can checked it if you want. It is everywhere.
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    Bruce1314 • 2 months ago
    I am fed up with western governments doing nothing for the persecution of our Christian brothers and sisters in Asia and mid east. The persecution of Christians and other minority religions in Pakistan are also being taking place by Muslims,and its getting worse,while Pakistani Government does little to protect them,so lets get tough with Pakistan Government and stop giving them £millions,until they protect the minorities.The so called peace loving moderate Pakistani Muslims in Christian UK are not long in taking to the streets in protest for the slightest thing said about Islam that they dont like ,so lets see them take to the streets in Christian UK in protest about the persecution of their own Pakistani Christian countrymen ,but of course they will never do so,simply because they are Christians
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    Guest Bruce1314 • 2 months ago
    Bruce – you could be Robert the Bruce leader of the new militant Christian Church fighters. You will have a reason to get out from behind your keyboard and actually do something.
    There is a Christian army fighting against Daesh in Iraq you could join. Lots of opportunities as you point out where someone who’s fed up with the system can actually do something about it.
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    Bruce1314 Guest • 2 months ago
    Paul,Unfortunately King Robert The Bruce,never made it to the Crusade in the Holy Land ,he died before he could,and unfortunately i am 75 years old so i would be a drawback,but what i can do is pray to St Michael Archangel and God to defeat the devil’s ISIS and Taliban ,and to to convince the politicians to do all they can when they come to my door looking for my vote in elections,for like you say there are lots of other opportunities.But i am surprised that living in a Christian country that Christians haven’t taken to the streets to demonstrate against persecution of their fellow Christians in Pakistan Asia Mid East
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    Guest Bruce1314 • 2 months ago
    Where’s the leadership? Are our bishops and cardinals even really talking about it? Do you think if a bishop got his diocese together they would make an impact – at least on the local level and go from there?

    Reformer Pope Francis is correct – the clerics need to stop being paper pushers, get out from behind their desks, and become pastors.
    Pols could care less about organizing a Christian demonstration and if you quiz them for your vote they’ll make a promise they never plan to keep.

    You’re still feisty at 75 good for you. I took you to be 1/2 your age! Stay that way and stir the pot. If nothing else you might get a few people to pause and think. Yes, St Michael is a favorite of mine. I have his picture on my wall to watch over me – we need all the help we can get.
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    Bruce1314 Guest • 2 months ago
    Your comments about leadership are spot on.Recently there was a special collection in our parish for the suffering Palestinians in Gaza Strip,who are mainly Muslim,some of the few Christians living there are also being persecuted by Muslim extremists living there ,yet no special collection for our persecuted Christian Brethern in Iraq and Syria,i always give to special collections,but i felt conscience bound not to give to this one.Our parish priests have never once mentioned the persecutions when i was at Mass,i dont recall our Bishop either.Its absolutely unbelievable in our country Scotland and south in England where we suffered persecution for centuries,where in 16th century the ISIS and Taliban of the day,namely the heretics John Knox and King Henry V111 and followers,destroyed 1,500 years of Christian history in few months ,destroying beautiful ancient cathedrals,monasteries,statues,frescoes,paintings,mosaiics,baptismal marriage records,religious books,etc etc,and anything that went against their warped heretical theology,1,500 years of history all lossed forever This unnecessary destruction and its legacy lies deep in the wounds of Catholics here,so surely its in the minds of the Clergy here,and is comparable to present day ISIS destruction of Christianity.To be fair on the Clergy,the lay person’s at the readings,do ask congregation to pray for our persecuted brethern,but i am still waiting for a sermon or a mention from Clergy–“St Michael Gu Brath”
    see more
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    Guest Bruce1314 • 2 months ago
    Ah, the destruction of the monasteries and other church properties. Another woman, a Brit, and I were discussing it just the other week. I had done a study paper on this very subject many moons ago. It was quite a wake-up call for me with what was done to the Catholics under false pretenses. She left me with a strong impression of the impact it has on people until today. You very much echo her statements & sentiments. I feel as if I am redeemed after reading these two sentiments. I wrote harshly of King Henry VIII and surprisingly got the other side in my professors notes and a lower grade than expected. It’s all behind me, of course, but, it is nice to learn I didn’t miss the mark as badly as I was led to believe.

    The Middle East is a mess and getting worse. A few decades ago I traveled to the area and am not inclined to return – especially to Israel. The latest on Israel is that it is a mess and will only get worse now the Netanyahu has said there will be no Palestinian statehood while he is Prime Minister. He has practically sounded the death knell for Israel.
    Yes, I can imagine the destruction of religious objects in the Middle East reminds Catholics of what their ancestors endured under the English. I didn’t realize they added insult to injury by unnecessarily destroying documents, and priceless artifacts. It shows we haven’t come very far from where we started many centuries ago. The Old Testament is full of the same destruction that is going on today…. and for no good purpose!

    Getting older has its pros and cons. Though you have a decade on me I had the recent experience of losing most of my hearing and hearing aids don’t help my condition. It’s a mixed blessing really. I don’t have to listen to the sermons and appeals. I agree that you were wise not to give to a collection with which you objected. Most people follow that rule. It may be the case that your church or pastor has a connection to a church in the Palestinian area. Having been there I know the Franciscans have jurisdiction of the Holy Land. They send appeals to churches all over the world. I don’t know why they feel a need to do that because the tourist business is a great source of income – when there’s no fighting. The need is great in almost every part of the world. It is overwhelming at times.

    I don’t think the local churches have gotten Pope Francis’ message yet. It’s not as if he hasn’t spoken clearly and often enough about the Middle East Christians. Even a little bit would go a long way for them. Francis is a great voice for ecumenism. It seems the world is getting more dangerous based on one’s religion. Here is America we’ve been fairly isolated from it. But, those times may be soon ending. The world seems more threatening what with Putin now beating the war drums because of his foolhardy move into Crimea and Eastern Ukraine. It seems the world is rushing headlong into a course of destruction from which it may not be able to turn back. In this regard we are like every other human on Earth.

    Could you translate the “Gu Brath” for me. I am of mostly Irish ancestry with some Scotch and English. I don’t know the language and the google translator didn’t work for this. I have a St Michael medal I was given over 35 years ago that I wear with my cross most every day. I have a St Michael icon on my wall. I have a special devotion to St Joseph who has worked some miraculous wonders in my life with GOD’s permission, of course. It’s a spiritual battle we are in, not just physical, and the devil will get more desperate as the world’s clock approaches midnight. Thank GOD Jesus has won this battle for us and ours is to persevere until the end.
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    Bruce1314 Guest • 2 months ago
    Yes Palestine should be an independent state.It was not the English or Henry V111 who destroyed Catholic heritage and culture in Scotland in 16th century,it was the heretic John Knox,he started Presbyterianism a form of Calvinism.”Gu Brath” is Scottish and Irish Gaelic, language meaning,”Forever”
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    Elijah fan • 2 months ago
    Always the de rigeur predictable Vatican canard that the UN must be in charge. Russia is in the Security Council and allies with Syria. So is China in the SC and she needs oil and is not famous for ethics. Archbishop Tomasi and Popes should be forced by hard ball reporters to recite the UN record on failed protection in post Yugoslavia, Africa etc….but they won’t be asked…because reporters want repeat access in order to pay for the mortgage so they never ask if Popes etc. know the UN record.
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    Aris • 2 months ago
    Many people feel that military action is a necessary form of self-defense. But consider: Although first-century Christians were cruelly persecuted and refused to fight back, they survived. The powerful Roman Empire was not able to wipe out Christianity. True Christians thrive even today, and they continue to maintain a neutral stand. Rather than taking matters into their own hands, they confidently look to God for help. His Word, the Bible, states: “Do not avenge yourselves, beloved, but yield place to the wrath; for it is written: ‘Vengeance ismine; I will repay, says Jehovah.’”—Romans 12:19.
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    SuchindranathAiyer • 2 months ago
    West Bengal: India: Based on track record, adherents of which faith are capable of raping a 71 year old Nun? Which faith posits that spiritual evolution and paradise can be achieved by right rape? The Cardinal of Bhaste Bhengal might change his tune and blame the real perpetrators rather than Mr. Narendra Modi for the rape of septuagenarian Nuns once the message reaches him that the Vatican has voted in favour of waging war on Islam at the UN. The Moslems have a certain Je ne se qois that their fellow Abrahamists find
    irresistible. Almost Abrabaconish. Hindus do not have that privilege. Because, in India, while Churches are said to be attacked, Mosques are not. (Even though temples are plundered by both State and Non State actors).
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  4. Sorry, folks, but we are way off topic with this stuff.

    Please stick to the topic – the topic is whether or not the Pope should show some of his famous “mercy” to those of us now dubbed “traditional” Catholics, by allowing us access to the traditional Mass.

    IC,

    If you post a link, there’s no need to post the entire contents of any other website. It makes it off-putting to read such lengthy comments, especially with unnecessary information in there such as “no of comments” and such like – I suggest you either just post the link with a short comment, or a paragraph or two plus the link. Bloggers are much more likely to read the whole thing on the original website, than here.

    Anyway, please do not divert us from the topic.

    Our custom here is to email the editor, or put a request on the General Discussion thread, if you wish a particular topic to be discussed and then I will, more likely than not, launch a thread on that topic. We do not take kindly to having our topics ignored and the threads diverted. As stated in our in-house rules (see About Us, top of page) I really should delete off topic comments, but will leave these for now. Since the question about Islam/Pope Francis has been asked and answered, I would ask you to leave that matter aside and respond now to the topic question, which is…

    Should the Pope order his priests to provide Traditional Latin Masses around the world, to mark the Year of Mercy?

    Note: any further comments on the Islam issue will be deleted.

    • Editor,

      Apologies for going off topic. May I just thank Islamic Crusader for going to all that trouble to answer my question and just to say he cleared up my confusion because I mistakenly thought he meant the Pope was meaning to send soldiers to deal with the Islamic terrorism against Christians. I see that’s not what he meant.
      I won’t say any more on that topic and thank you for letting me see the replies.

      On topic: I definitely think that the Pope should make it clear that he wants all parishes to provide traditional Masses but of course he won’t. The way he punished the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate shows he has no mercy when it comes to tradition.

  5. Speaking of adherence to the traditional mass, in a show of extreme irony, the curial Archbishop Pozzo has urged the faithful to “not relent in the pursuit of the traditional mass” and to “resist any undue resistance”.

    This, while the Vatican – including Pozzos own Ecclesei Dei commission – continue to hold the SSPX at arms length and present undue resistance to the advancement of tradition in general.

    http://eponymousflower.blogspot.co.uk/2015/05/archbishop-pozzo-at-shroud-of-turin-do.html

    • Gabriel Syme,

      That is ironical right enough – why can’t Archbishop Pozzo et al see the contradiction in what they are saying and doing? Why are they so terrified of the SSPX? It really is a puzzle.

  6. It’s extremely sad, but not really a puzzle when you think of 28 years of brainwashing – “The SSPX are schismatic, shock horror, bad, bad, bad”. The Ecclesia Dei Commission was set up to prevent the laity who couldn’t tolerate the new Mass from finding it in SSPX chapels. When I was in Rome in 1998 I heard Mgr. Perl say that the EDC would work towards making itself redundant, for those with a ‘nostalgia’ for the old Mass would soon die off. To be fair, Mgr. Perl eventually saw that the old Mass itself wouldn’t die, and his cynicism was replaced by something a little more constructive. Nevertheless Abp. Pozzo’s call is only for resistance within the mainstream against those bishops who will not implement SP and who put obstacles in the way of diocesan priests wishing to celebrate the old Mass. I do however believe that there is a different and more enlightened spirit at work in the EDC than there was in 1998, and I think that Bp. Fellay’s patience will bear fruit in God’s good time.

  7. Christina,

    I do not think for a second that Pope Francis will give us a traditional Mass in honour of the Year of Mercy. He seems to hate it, God forgive him.

    I agree with you that Bishop Fellay’s patience will bear fruit in God’s good time. That is for sure.

  8. Fidelis, do you think I said the Pope would give us a Mass in the Year of Mercy? ‘Cos I didn’t. The EDC isn’t THAT enlightened yet!

    • Christina,

      No, sorry, I didn’t think you were saying that, I was just responding to the blog article.

      I’m also wondering where he’s going to get all the priests to be “missionaries of mercy” as there’s already a dire shortage in the parishes.

      Also, I think I’m right in saying this, I’m not sure, but I think the bishops have already delegated absolution for sins like abortion to the priests in the parish, so what Pope Francis is on about, is anybody’s guess (as usual).

  9. I was wryly amused by Pope Francis’s latest ‘missionaries of mercy’ folly, as it sounds rather as if he’s resurrecting something like the role of the quaestores or pardoners, which Chaucer famously ridiculed in the ‘Canterbury Tales’. Don’t worry about the shortage of priests bit, though, Fidelis, as the office of pardoner could be held by laymen! What fun! With all the clamour of feminist nuns we may see them flying round the world (on broomsticks?) forgiving their sisters’ sins’. I can see that resurrecting the office of pardoner might perversely appeal to Francis, as it was suppressed by the Council of Trent in 1562!

  10. Sorry about apostrophe after ‘sins’. This tablet I’m using has an illiterate mind of its own.

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